[opendtv] Re: FCC CHAIRMAN PROPOSAL TO UNLOCK THE SET-TOP BOX: CREATING CHOICE & INNOVATION

  • From: "Manfredi, Albert E" <albert.e.manfredi@xxxxxxxxxx>
  • To: "opendtv@xxxxxxxxxxxxx" <opendtv@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Sun, 14 Feb 2016 01:33:14 +0000

Craig Birkmaier wrote:

Broadcasters looked at the DTV standard from the perspective of
how their analog facilities operated. They completely ignored
the fundamental transformation enabled by "being digital."

Unfortunately, you misunderstood this at least as much as they did, Craig. 
Among other things, you thought "no standards" were required. But I've 
explained this too many times to see the same old arguments go back to square 1.

We explained that the compression and services layers of a DTV
standard would evolve continuously,

Those are empty words. The ATSC standard could accommodate whatever updates you 
wanted, in codec or anything else. So you focused on the wrong aspects. The 
problem was not the standard, but how TV manufacturers implemented it, in 
receivers that were not software upgradeable at all. Haven't I just recently 
made those points to you, Craig? Why not pick up from there, instead of going 
back to square 1?

The entire ATSC standards process was a case study in collusion.

Only in the sense of royalties. There was no collusion between the owners of 
content, the distributors of content, and the CE companies. I saw no evidence 
of LG, or Samsung, or anyone else, each having to get in bed separately with 
CBS, to permit reception of CBS content on their sets. I see plenty of that 
collusion with streaming boxes now. How is it that you keep missing this?

These computing platforms do run browsers that access the Internet.
And they run programs and browser extensions that enabled the
computer to deal with the challenges of decoding and displaying
video.

You mean, functionally identical to what any PC can do, even though the PC can 
do this without having to beg for special favors?

But the content owners refused to allow their content

Can we get past this nonsense? We've been around this circle only a zillion 
times. Move on, Craig. Explain why these boxes need special favors. Explain why 
streaming box A must beg for a different interface protocol that streaming box 
B. Collusion, Craig. That's the only reason.

This notion that everything that touches the Internet must touch
everything is wrongheaded.

EVEN IF, in some cases, this might be true, e.g. Internet content meant for 
small smartphones might not make sense to large screens, this is flat absurd 
when it comes to streaming boxes. Or for that matter, even tablets. And even 
more absurd when each manufacturer has to collude separately.

The devices that connect to a TV to access OTT services that live
in the cloud are designed for the specific function of making that
content available to the TV. They are not designed to buy a TV from
Amazon, or post check-ins on Facebook.

How about letting the user decide? And how does this address that ONLY a 
handful of pay sites are receivable, and that AppleTV and Roku must beg 
separately for their special favors? You are attempting to drown out the 
argument out with an avalanche of pointless words, Craig. Address the core 
issues, without needing to be prompted?

Who do you think paid to develop the ATSC standard Bert?

It was the device makers

So what? A standard was needed, the device makers may have footed the bill, but 
many other organizations were also involved in ratifying it. Once the standard 
became approved, everyone could use it, and did. I don't see where the 
different TV manufacturers have to separately collude with the TV networks, to 
receive their signal.

Bert


 
 
----------------------------------------------------------------------
You can UNSUBSCRIBE from the OpenDTV list in two ways:

- Using the UNSUBSCRIBE command in your user configuration settings at 
FreeLists.org 

- By sending a message to: opendtv-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx with the word 
unsubscribe in the subject line.

Other related posts: