[opendtv] Re: FCC CHAIRMAN PROPOSAL TO UNLOCK THE SET-TOP BOX: CREATING CHOICE & INNOVATION

  • From: Craig Birkmaier <brewmastercraig@xxxxxxxxxx>
  • To: opendtv@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
  • Date: Sat, 13 Feb 2016 07:47:12 -0500

On Feb 12, 2016, at 8:11 PM, Manfredi, Albert E 
<albert.e.manfredi@xxxxxxxxxx> wrote:

Craig Birkmaier wrote:

You mean like the ATSC standard and the FCC mandate?

No, Craig. A standard had to be chosen. Whatever was chosen, someone would 
have benefitted, others would have lost out. Collusion is when different 
companies get in bed to remove competition, and demand higher prices as a 
result.

Like the ATSC standard.

Compare this to your cherished Internet.

The broadcasters had been using an end-to-end system to deliver synchronized 
analog TV streams to receivers that locked up to these streams. When you 
watched a football game, all the source devices were synchronized to each other 
so that you could switch from one source to another. The feed from the stadium 
was sent to a broadcast facility that was synced to that signal so it could add 
commercials locally via a master control switcher that fed the transmitter. The 
analog broadcast format was concerned with synchronizing the receiver to the 
signal that originated at the stadium. The FCC regulated the technical aspects 
of this signal so that everyone got a decent quality picture to watch. 

We were concerned with things like blanking intervals, color subcarriers and 
pre-filtering to deal with analog video compression (interlace), so that the 
delivered images filled the screen, people's faces were not purple, and moving 
objects with high contrast did not produce annoying flicker.

The first major uses for digital technology were related to synchronization - 
the frame store and time-base corrector. The frame store allowed the timing of 
a source to be adjusted to sync with the station - it was no longer necessary 
to "gen-lock the station to the network feed. The time base corrector allowed 
lower cost recording devices to be synchronized to the station and stabilized 
to eliminate timing errors, picture skew, etc.

Broadcasters looked at the DTV standard from the perspective of how their 
analog facilities operated. They completely ignored the fundamental 
transformation enabled by "being digital." They wanted another end-to-end 
standard where everything was defined and locked down.

I designed products that switched and mixed analog video signals. These 
products manipulated streams that had to be perfectly timed to one another. 
Special effects operated on streams - one line of video at a time.

As digital image processing started to transform my industry, I struggled for a 
bit to comprehend what this meant. My involvement in the ACATS process and the 
Task Force on Digital Image Architecture brought me together with scientists 
and engineers who did not wear "analog video blinders." They looked at video as 
just another bunch of bits to be processed. They were concerned about the 
pixels (samples) that constitute a frame, not the stream of frames that 
differentiate video from still images.

They looked at digital standards as layers. You needed some basic layers to 
move the bits around and to recover them. Everything above those basic layers 
was application specific - if you could represent something with bits you could 
continuously evolve the way those bits were processed to enable applications.

This was the essence of the "Internet stack" and the cultural framework to 
promote future innovation.

They understood that a broadcast standard needed only two things:

1. A modulation standard to transmit the bits;

2. A transport protocol to deliver the packets of bits that made up the video, 
audio, and data services, along with basic timing structures. 

One of the big mindfucks with digital compression was that the bits were not 
sent in the order they were created, or the order in which they would be 
displayed, as was the case with the early digital video recording formats. With 
entropy coding we worked with "GOPs" - Groups of Pictures. We sent the first 
and last picture in the group (I-frames), then the B and P frames that lay 
in-between. 

We explained that the compression and services layers of a DTV standard would 
evolve continuously, and that "smart receivers" would evolve rapidly as well. 
We told the FCC that they should only standardized the necessary modulation and 
transport layers, using the Internet as a model. Everything else could be left 
to the marketplace.

But the broadcasters and the ATSC had other ideas. They wanted another 
end-to-end standard, with everything defined. And they wanted to control every 
aspect of this standard to entrench their IP and protect their legacy 
investments - like the interlaced HDTV format developed in Japan. 

The entire ATSC standards process was a case study in collusion.

Thus it comes as no surprise that these folks continue to protect their 
lucrative industries, and collude to control the applications layers and the 
resulting revenues. The Internet is just another pipe to control - they live in 
fear of the competition and innovation it has unleashed.

If you build cars, you can either build the wheels to accept standard tire 
sizes, or you can collude with a single tire company, to create a specialty 
tire exclusive to this car model. Collusion is often used to raise the price, 
and only occasionally is there a real benefit to the consumer.

There is a fine line between collusion and innovation.

Just like Apple, Roku and the others get a share of the revenues
when they bring customers to these services.

Uncalled for collusion. HP and Dell managed to make it work without 
collusion. 

Really?

These computing platforms do run browsers that access the Internet. And they 
run programs and browser extensions that enabled the computer to deal with the 
challenges of decoding and displaying video.

But the content owners refused to allow their content on these machines. They 
saw what happened to the music industry with Napster. So they colluded with 
Intel and Microsoft and demanded that their content be protected. This resulted 
in new PC standards that made it difficult or impossible to access the video 
and audio bit streams, lest they be copied and proliferated.

HP and Dell, and every other PC manufacturer implement these content protection 
standards, born of collusion.

The content owners did the same with the TV manufacturers, which ultimately led 
to today's HDMI standards.

Blocking the consumer's access to the very vast majority of the Internet, 
INCLUDING access to any number of TV sites, should be hard to stomach.

Why?

What is the purpose of these devices?

This notion that everything that touches the Internet must touch everything is 
wrongheaded. We are now seeing a new phase of innovation surrounding the 
Internet of Things. We have all kinds of devices that do all kinds of things 
that do not rely on websites. 

The devices that connect to a TV to access OTT services that live in the cloud 
are designed for the specific function of making that content available to the 
TV. They are not designed to buy a TV from Amazon, or post check-ins on 
Facebook. 

The dot.com network TV web sites, and the new OTT services like Netflix are 
designed to deliver video to PCs and some mobile devices that run web browsers. 
they ARE NOT there to deliver content to TVs. The fact that the Internet pipe 
is used to deliver the bits is decoupled from the application.

To sell TV content.

40% of their revenue is coming from new sources - mostly paid
streaming services. That's called BUSINESS Bert.

Craig, it is incomprehensibly difficult, if not impossible, to make you 
understand new ideas. Honestly.

What makes sense for CBS does not have to make sense for the STB 
manufacturer. Get it? Why do you waste time with specious arguments?

They are in this together Bert. How is it that you do not understand this.

CBS is in the business of creating and selling content. The Internet has 
enabled  an significant expansion of their customer base, and some fundamental 
changes in the way their content is consumed. 

There is nothing new here in terms of business. 

Who do you think paid to develop the ATSC standard Bert?

The television networks?
The broadcast stations?
The MVPDs?

NO.

It was the device makers - Sony, Panasonic, Sharp,  Phillips, Thompson, Zenith 
and their R&D labs like Sarnoff. 

The only thing that has changed is that companies that understand what being 
digital is all about are eating the lunch of the old guard CE companies.

Really. Most sets still overscan. For a web browser to work properly
you need a 1:1 relationship between source and display pixels.

That's overly religious adherence to a concept that is, in practice, totally 
insignificant. The plain fact is, HDTVs work just fine as PC monitors, 
especially when viewed at typical TV viewing distances. Trying to invent some 
problem that doesn't exist, in reality, is a waste of time.

They ARE displays Bert. They come off of the same fabs.

But the internal processing is not the same. And most people do not use their 
TVs to surf the web. As I have said many times, the TV is evolving into the 
display that will be used by groups of people for collaborative experiences. 
Watching TV is one application. Games, sharing your selfies and video clips, 
and watching the latest You Tube cat video are other applications.

There is a reason the PC was designed the way it was. There's a big clue in the 
acronym - PC

It is a PERSONAL computer.

Regards
Craig
 
 
----------------------------------------------------------------------
You can UNSUBSCRIBE from the OpenDTV list in two ways:

- Using the UNSUBSCRIBE command in your user configuration settings at 
FreeLists.org 

- By sending a message to: opendtv-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx with the word 
unsubscribe in the subject line.

Other related posts: