[opendtv] Re: FCC CHAIRMAN PROPOSAL TO UNLOCK THE SET-TOP BOX: CREATING CHOICE & INNOVATION

  • From: Craig Birkmaier <brewmastercraig@xxxxxxxxxx>
  • To: opendtv@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
  • Date: Tue, 09 Feb 2016 07:31:49 -0500



Regards
Craig

On Feb 8, 2016, at 9:30 PM, Manfredi, Albert E <albert.e.manfredi@xxxxxxxxxx> 
wrote:

You need to do a paradigm shift, Craig, and instead you're still thinking in 
terms of proprietary STBs and other legacy ideas.

You mean like using a PC as a front end for a TV?

Earth to Bert. I was writing about the paradigm shift we are experiencing more 
than two decades ago. 

I was trying to get broadcasters to support a paradigm shift instead of another 
brain dead tuner in a TV. Two decades later the ATSC is talking about another 
standards because of this paradigm shift.

 I was working with the FCC in 1993 to help them to understand this paradigm 
shift and how to open up the market for set top boxes.

Please stop lecturing me about the issues we are discussing.

This is IP now, not solutions that are hard coded in a box. There's 
absolutely no reason to think that receivers built to be essentially thin 
clients would not allow for innovation.

There are many reasons to believe this. TV manufacturers have been building 
"thin clients" into TVs for almost a decade. They are now a standard feature in 
most mid and high end TVs. Yet most people do not use them.

More than 50 million streaming media players have been sold, and this does not 
include the millions of game consoles (and PCs) that are being used to access 
OTT services.

I guess the American public is just stupid, including both of us. I use an 
Apple TV and you use a PC and a Roku box.

Why?

Because people like choice and innovation. People are choosing ecosystems that 
tie multiple IP clients together to enhance functionality. And in some cases 
companies like Amazon are building streaming services optimized for their 
boxes, while choosing not to support others.

The TV is just a big (expensive) display. In a world where the Internet of 
Things is beginning to become meaningful it makes good sense for the TV to 
include a thin client...

A VERY THIN CLIENT.

Support for basic functions is useful and necessary:
- power (on/off)
- volume for internal speakers
- control of display functions (brightness, contrast, etc).
- access to mandated (and optional) internal tuners

If a manufacturer wants to compete at higher levels that's their choice. It's 
been rumored for years that Apple is going to build an integrated TV. That has 
not happened, and it is unlikely it ever will. Why constrain your market 
competing in a business that has a very long history of racing to the bottom, 
competing for razor thin margins?

You are correct that it is now possible to design products that can evolve and 
differentiate themselves via software. But hardware is still a factor. 

How the user interface is controlled; cameras to support gesture control and 
two-way video services like FaceTime; audio inputs to support voice commands, 
telephone and video chat functions; support for gaming; home security; IOT 
hubs; and things that have yet to be invented.

Maybe putting all this stuff into a DISPLAY, is the real legacy idea.

On the contrary, IP solutions allow for a lot more innovation. Not just 
because the box itself is software upgradeable, but much more importantly, 
because the UI and the controls permitted by your in-home box are now in the 
hands of any number of different innovative organizations, operating "in the 
cloud." There's NO REASON to limit your thinking to what STBs did in the past.

Correct. It is better to think in terms of what multiple devices tied together 
via IP can do today and in the future.

Apple is already differentiating Apple TV with cloud based services 
- Siri voice based commands and search
- Access to your personal content stored in the cloud
- And Apps that allow developers to create all kinds of services in the cloud

Amazon and Google are doing the same. Sony and Microsoft have used game 
consoles as their Trojan Horses to control the big screen display.

So what, Craig? If today you decide to plug in a PC to your Cox broadband, 
you can watch all your TV over IP. Whether it's TVE or OTT sites. You do not 
need to wait for anyone or anything.

Sorry Bert. That's simply wrong.

I could watch some of my TV via IP, not all. I could not access much of the 
content I watch today, because it is not available via TVE or OTT services.

You can remain in the walled garden virtually, with TVE, or subscribe only to 
broadband service from Cox. And then subscribe to Sling TV for your sports 
fix. And any number of options in-between. 

I cannot get much of the content I watch from Sling TV. That is why I still 
grit my teeth and overpay Cox for the extended basic bundle. I have told you 
MANY times that I will cut the cord when Les and his buddies decide to license 
their content to a VMVPD service that offers the content I want.

You saw how content owners are interested in streaming their content. If 
enough people start doing this, you can be positive that TVE options will 
expand, to include whatever you think you think is missing now. There is no 
waiting involved. Like I said, I made the switch almost 6t years ago, and 
Craig still insists it can't be done.

The TVE options are expanding. I had not used my Apple TV recently and decided 
to watch something on Netflix this weekend. The number of TVE Apps almost 
doubled in a matter of months. 

But YOU cannot access TVE sites Bert. That requires a subscription to a MVPD 
service that includes the TVE equivalents. That's the Catch 22 issue in your 
simplistic but meaningless suggestion above.

Just about anything costs less than monthly rentals, and certainly my PC 
costs less that being shackled to the restrictions imposed by Apple TV.

So you shackle yourself to the restrictions of what you can access via the 
limited free options available OTT.

In any case, I already explained to you, Craig, how a cheap and flexible thin 
client can be built. You're really stuck in retro thinking, Craig.

Look in the mirror Bert. You will see who is stuck in retro thinking.

Regards
Craig
 
 
----------------------------------------------------------------------
You can UNSUBSCRIBE from the OpenDTV list in two ways:

- Using the UNSUBSCRIBE command in your user configuration settings at 
FreeLists.org 

- By sending a message to: opendtv-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx with the word 
unsubscribe in the subject line.

Other related posts: