[opendtv] Re: FCC CHAIRMAN PROPOSAL TO UNLOCK THE SET-TOP BOX: CREATING CHOICE & INNOVATION

  • From: Craig Birkmaier <brewmastercraig@xxxxxxxxxx>
  • To: opendtv@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
  • Date: Sat, 06 Feb 2016 20:08:58 -0500

On Feb 5, 2016, at 9:09 PM, Manfredi, Albert E <albert.e.manfredi@xxxxxxxxxx> 
wrote


Look at the subject line. The only thing we're talking about here is how to 
cleverly, vs obtusely, design a standard interface for TV, ca. 2016.

Really.  Did you read the FCC proposal?

It does not call for a standard interface for a TV. It does not mention the TV 
at all. The subject line reads:

Re: FCC CHAIRMAN PROPOSAL TO UNLOCK THE SET-TOP BOX: CREATING CHOICE & 
INNOVATION

Creating a standard interface for a TV does not create choice or innovation. 
The proposal specifically calls for standards for the critical information 
streams needed to create devices that can connect to the MVPD systems, as their 
STBs do today.

But we've already been through this several times.

That's all, Craig. You can retain all the same old ideas you cherish, about 
walled gardens and keeping them walled up, without having to use the types of 
linear, frequency divided channels, which were state of the art in the last 
century. I already explained how.

You have explained how you would solve the problem by completely upgrading the 
existing infrastructures of existing MVPD systems, including most of the 
millions of STBs that exist today.

It is technically feasible, but could not happen in a matter of months, or even 
a few years.

Start with TVE, for example. Same old walls, but only artificial. No 
"channels" in sight. No problem with "guides." No need for new standards.

The MVPDs do not own or operate the TVE services. And there are MANY existing 
networks (channels) for which there are no complementary TVE services. And 
there is the minor issue, that the bandwidth does not exist today for >80 
million homes to access the TVE sites. Granted, freeing up the bandwidth used 
for in-band video services will go a long way toward solving this problem, but 
in many systems the number of homes per PON will need to be reduced from 
today's average of 250, to about 50. 

Don't bother...

We've been over all of this before too.

Never mind that legacy MVPD systems have their own standards for
delivering "guide" information;

Once again: legacy thinking. Guide information today is already provided over 
HTTP, even by via MVPDs for TVE. Everyone knows this, and how to use it. No 
one, certainly not the FCC, is mandating that a third party box must be 
designed only with old ideas.

But that is not how these systems do it today. This is another upgrade that 
requires almost all existing MVPD STBs to be replaced. The FCC proposal simply 
asks that the MVPDs publish and license the interfaces to the costing systems, 
and leaves the development of new standards such as you propose to a standards 
group that does not exist today.

Now, it is certainly true that if an individual or organization is dead set 
AGAINST such third party boxes ever existing, that individual or organization 
will champion the most laborious, time consuming method possible, requiring 
as much consensus among players as possible, hoping to stall the entire 
effort into oblivion.

You mean like they have bern doing for the past two decades?

This seems to be Craig's approach. Insist on using the old proprietary 
techniques, do everything possible to bog down the effort, EVEN THOUGH 
standard-based techniques exist, have been widely deployed by MVPDs and 
content owners already, and people are very familiar with the UIs already.

Even if this is true, it would still take years to upgrade all of these systems.

Never mind that the Internet ALSO has multiple ways to do the
same things;

So, pick one or more. I go to the different TV network sites. Each one does 
their guide differently. No problem. TVE has already managed this "problem," 
Craig. Amazon uses Silverlight. The TV networks use Flash. That's really 
complicated, Craig. I wonder how Dell figured this out.

So which one do you make the standard interface to build into a TV?

The Internet standards approach encourages choice and innovation. But more 
important it allows companies to innovate at the higher levels of the stack to 
build upon the lower levels that are required to handle the basic functions. 
This is how your beloved FLASH was possible, and Silverlight as well. When 
there is consensus that open industry standards are needed to support services 
that have become popular, the IETF gets everyone together to create the new 
standards. Thus we now have HTML5.

By the way, Amazon still supports Flash and Silverlight for older PCs, but has 
moved on and now recommends their HTML5 player for newer devices including 
their FireTV products. The same is true for the broadcast networks.

Dell has figured out how to run standard web browsers. They have not figured 
out how to interface with MVPD systems. 

Never mind that this would require a major upgrade of every
legacy system;

Upgrade of what system?

Every existing MVPD system and most of the STBs they have deployed.

Old TV sets would presumably use these STBs - that's the upgrade. New TV sets 
would have the IP front end built in.

Why build it in. There may be multiple standards Bert, as you note above.an IP 
front end only deals with the lower levels of the stack. Choice and innovation 
means that there can me many solutions.

We've already been through this too.

The MVPDs would build on what they already do with TVE.

You mean the authentication servers?

They do not operate the TVE servers.

Which means, they can leave that job to someone else, or that can take it 
more in-house.

More upgrades.



Never mind that the systems, and the companies that want to
compete for the new devices needed to make this work must agree
on the details, then develop these new devices.

You mean, like Dell does? Like Lenovo does? All the pieces exist.

To support web browsers. And who wants to use a PC as the new front end to 
their TV?

Don't bother.

You can simply make a list of protocol standards that already exist, that 
you'd want boxes to be compatible with. HTML5? Flash? Silverlight? And so on.

Then upgrade every MVPD system to support them. 

But that is not what the FCC proposal asks for. Maybe someday...

That is not what they are asking for. The proposal asks that
the MVPD systems open up their kimonos

No, Craig. The proposal asks for a standard interface.

Wrong. Read it again.

The FCC, lawyers, use some example text that sounds just as retro as your 
thinking on this matter. But at the same time, they say quite clearly that 
they are not mandating design solutions.

Right.. Choice and innovation.

They also say that they want the boxes to support Internet streaming.

Correct. They say consumers should be able to access MVPDs and Internet streams 
in "one place," I.e a single device. As you say, they are not telling the MVPDs 
and new device makers how to do this.


So expand your thinking, Craig. The boxes can do both jobs with exactly the 
same set of tools.

Not now. Better take another look at what's inside a Tivo Bolt.

It's possible this could be the solution...

Or not.

But NONE of this has anything to do with the issue of how to
build new appliances; appliances that must evolve with new
technologies and real innovation.

Craig is obviously grasping at straws, inventing obstacles that don't exist. 
Such appliances already exist. How hard is it to develop a "thin client," 
with HDMI outputs, based on a Raspberry Pi? Low cost, very flexible. Do you 
really think such a box would even come close to what an AppleTV box costs?

You can buy a Gen 3 Apple TV box for $65. The new boxes cost more and do more, 
with a much more sophisticated UI. There's more to innovation than building a 
web browser.

No, they hire Craig to invent fictitious problems.
They don't need me. They have a bunch of lawyers...

Once again, you expand what's there, you don't spend billions.

Sorry, but that's not true. We're talking about tens of millions of new STBs, 
rebuilding every head end, and a bunch of new PONs.

TVE exists, Craig. In fact, the MVPDs can continue to use their old school 
STBs for those who fear change, Craig, even while allowing others to move 
into the 21st century. And as people buy the more flexible new boxes, the 
MVPDs will see a decline of the use of the legacy technology.

The FCC was mandated to open up the market for STBs for the legacy MVPD systems 
Bert.

VMVPD services could provide competition using the solutions you propose; as 
you point out, they already do this.

But that's not the problem this proposal is trying to solve.


Regards
Craig

 
 
----------------------------------------------------------------------
You can UNSUBSCRIBE from the OpenDTV list in two ways:

- Using the UNSUBSCRIBE command in your user configuration settings at 
FreeLists.org 

- By sending a message to: opendtv-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx with the word 
unsubscribe in the subject line.

Other related posts: