[opendtv] Re: EPA tightens up power specs for PCs

  • From: John Willkie <johnwillkie@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • To: opendtv@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
  • Date: Mon, 30 Oct 2006 12:59:55 -0800 (GMT-08:00)

All that may be true, but the LA case was on point.  and a $1 verdict for the 
plaintiffs.

In the NCL case, GM found advantage by -- instead of letting them fail 
profoundly -- buying failing transit companies and getting them to buy 
GM-centric products and services.  It kept failing companies alive, with GM 
holding the tether.  As a result of the verdict, transit in Chicago became 
government-owned on the same post-war time scale as most others.

Funny, this summary didn't mention GM's cross-investment in Dupont (which was 
spun off a few years before the verdict due to government action and settled 
separately.)


John Willkie

-----Original Message-----
>From: John Shutt <shuttj@xxxxxxxxx>
>Sent: Oct 30, 2006 11:55 AM
>To: opendtv@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
>Subject: [opendtv] Re: EPA tightens up power specs for PCs
>
>From Wikipedia, but mostly accurate.  GM was convicted on antitrust for 
>forcing National City Lines (the evil GM bus company) to buy only GM busses. 
>There was no convictions on conspiring to purchase and put out of business 
>trolley lines.
>
>http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/General_Motors_streetcar_conspiracy
>
>Government attorney Bradford Snell has written that in 1949 GM and its 
>partners in NCL were convicted in U.S. District Court in Chicago of criminal 
>conspiracy in this matter and fined $5,000 each for anti-trust violations 
>(contracts in restraint of trade, i.e. forcing subsidiaries to buy products 
>from their owners: GM buses, Firestone tires, Standard and Phillips oil).
>
>The claim above is often repeated and is based on testimony by Snell to a 
>United States Senate inquiry in 1974.
>
>The case ultimately reached the United States Supreme Court in United States 
>v. National City Lines Inc. 334 U.S. 573, 596 (1948) ("National City I")[1] 
>which reversed lower court rulings on the case.
>
>The proceedings were against General Motors and its subsidiary National City 
>Lines, along with seven other corporations. They were indicted on two counts 
>under the US Sherman Antitrust Act. The charges, in summary, were:
>
>Conspiring to acquire control of a number of transit companies, forming a 
>transportation monopoly;
>All defendants were acquitted on this charge.
>
>Conspiring to monopolize sales of buses and supplies to companies owned by 
>National City Lines.
>General Motors alone was convicted on this charge.
>
>----- Original Message ----- 
>From: "Tom Barry" <trbarry@xxxxxxxxxxx>
>To: <opendtv@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
>Sent: Monday, October 30, 2006 2:48 PM
>Subject: [opendtv] Re: EPA tightens up power specs for PCs
>
>
>> John -
>>
>> Which case are you referring to?
>>
>> - Tom
>>
>>
>> John Willkie wrote:
>>> Ah, yes.  The "famous" case in LA.  After 13 years of litigation the 
>>> "trolley" interests (long bought out by GM) "won."
>>>
>>> The award should have been a message.  13 years of litigation.  You 
>>> "won."  And, the judge awarded you $1.
>
>
> 
> 
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