[opendtv] Re: Best apps to enhance your Super Bowl 50 viewing experience | Fox News Video

  • From: Craig Birkmaier <brewmastercraig@xxxxxxxxxx>
  • To: opendtv@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
  • Date: Sun, 07 Feb 2016 00:09:13 -0500

On Feb 6, 2016, at 7:27 PM, Manfredi, Albert E <albert.e.manfredi@xxxxxxxxxx> 
wrote:

Craig Birkmaier wrote:

You are the one constantly claiming that live linear TV is
dying and is unnecessary. THAT is going negative.

How is that negative? Or did you think that the introduction of VCRs was 
negative? I'm puzzled by your weird motivations, Craig.

With a response like that I can understand why you are puzzled?

We've been over this in depth, too many times to mention. I don't know why you 
feel it necessary to kill a service that still delivers about 70% of the TV 
programs people watch, but I do know that your completely out of sync with 
business realities.

Your defense of retaining wasteful one-way broadcast spectrum is always 
couched in terms of this mysterious fear of the disappearance of linear, by 
appointment viewing.

There is nothing wasteful about a service that delivers the vast majority of TV 
entertainment in the U.S.

Your contention that this PRIVATELY OWNED bandwidth is being wasted and should 
be used for broadband, so everyone can stream TV entertainment from the 
Internet, completely ignores the reality that almost everyone who wants to do 
this can. And it ignores the reality that the wired MVPDs are rapidly upgrading 
their systems to deliver gigabit broadband alongside their in-band video 
services.

There you go again. So on the one hand, you claim we don't need more 
bandwidth. And in the next breath, you claim we need at least a decade or 
more to get enough bandwidth. So, which is it Craig? Do we need no more 
bandwidth, or not?

You are confused. There is a difference between how rapidly something CAN 
HAPPEN, and how long it will take for it TO HAPPEN. This is no different that 
your constant rants that cord cutting is rampant.

What YOU want to happen is completely disconnected from business realities and 
what the people who run these businesses are doing. And it is completely 
disconnected from what consumers are doing.

We have all the last mile bandwidth we need, Craig, for TV streaming, except 
in rural settings perhaps, if the spectrum is allocated efficiently. Not in 
decades, but now. If broadband is available today to 70+% of households, and 
it's higher than that already depending how you define broadband, then if 
80+% of cable system/FiOS spectrum is freed up, even without having to create 
a lot of new PONs, we would have a pretty high percentage of homes all set, 
eh Craig?

Dream on. Aside from being off on your stats, you are promoting a transition 
scenario that make NO BUSINESS SENSE. 

If you're among the 25+% of households with no broadband, tell me how you can 
stream.

Where did you pull that spec out of?

It stinks!

Try this, published by the FCC on January 29th.

https://www.fcc.gov/reports-research/reports/broadband-progress-reports/2016-broadband-progress-report
2016 Broadband Progress Report

While the nation continues to make progress in broadband deployment, many 
Americans still lack access to advanced, high-quality voice, data, graphics and 
video offerings, especially in rural areas and on Tribal lands, according to 
the 2016 Broadband Progress Report adopted by the Federal Communications 
Commission.

Key findings include the following:

10 percent of all Americans (34 million people) lack access to 25 Mbps/3 Mbps 
service. 
39 percent of rural Americans (23 million people) lack access to 25 Mbps/3 Mbps.
By contrast, only 4 percent of urban Americans lack access to 25 Mbps/3 Mbps 
broadband.
The availability of fixed terrestrial services in rural America continues to 
lag behind urban America at all speeds:  20 percent lack access even to service 
at 4 Mbps/1 Mbps, down only 1 percent from 2011, and 31 percent lack access to 
10 Mbps/1 Mbps, down only 4 percent from 2011.
41 percent of Americans living on Tribal lands (1.6 million people) lack access 
to 25 Mbps/3 Mbps broadband
68 percent living in rural areas of Tribal lands (1.3 million people) lack 
access.
Consistency, Craig.

You ARE consistent Bert.

Consistently wrong.

Regards
Craig

Other related posts: