[opendtv] Re: Best apps to enhance your Super Bowl 50 viewing experience | Fox News Video

  • From: Craig Birkmaier <brewmastercraig@xxxxxxxxxx>
  • To: opendtv@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
  • Date: Fri, 05 Feb 2016 08:35:42 -0500

On Feb 4, 2016, at 9:09 PM, Manfredi, Albert E <albert.e.manfredi@xxxxxxxxxx> 
wrote:

And once again (I'm not sure why this question seems to elude you), why do 
you think this is bad?

I do not think it is bad. I think it is absurd and irrelevant. All we are 
seeing is another shift in viewing behavior thanks to the never ending March of 
technology.

But for some reason you see the end of a medium that hundreds of millions of 
people around the world will be tuning into Sunday. If it makes you feel 
better, millions of people will be watching the best commercials again next 
week via streaming Internet sites...

Why is it bad that people have found a better way of watching TV, than the 60 
year old, quaint, by-appointment linear stream??

It is not bad Bert, it is an option. 

Just as the VCR added an option. Just as DVD added an option. Just as in-band 
PPV added an option. Just as iTunes TV and movie downloads added an option.

TV and later, the ability to watch movies at home, had an impact on the theater 
business. Weekly newsreels did die because of the immediacy of TV. But millions 
of people still go to the theater, despite the fact that they can access almost 
every movie made in the last 60 years on demand.

Why is it bad that people have found more competitive sources for TV content, 
than what was once their only choice, the walled garden options?

Just more choices. The walled gardens are doing just fine Bert - making more 
money than ever.

It's not like no one is watching TV. People are watching more TV than ever, 
once you get past all the inaccurate, partial counting. So what exactly 
motivates you to think any of this is negative?

Never said it was. But you tell us that live linear is dying all the time.

Why is it bad if a lot more capacity can be assigned to broadband, by 
eliminating wasteful broadcast streams, to foster more competitive options 
yet?

Because it is not necessary at this time. Not to mention I still watch far more 
live linear TV than streaming TV. Then again I spend almost as much time 
writing e-mails arguing with you.

I checked the speed of my broadband around 10 pm a few nights ago - 66 Mbps 
downstream. I signed up for 25 Mbps two years ago; they upgraded my service to 
50 Mbps last year for the same price. 

I am really getting screwed!

But that is irrelevant to this discussion. We're talking about
using the Internet as a "back channel" for broadcast and live
linear TV.

Recycled comment from many years ago. You are not describing anything 
technically innovative. You are simply adding a two-way comm link (Internet) 
to the one-way broadcast program, *exactly* the same as you do with talk 
radio.

Yup.

The two-way Internet session has no technical relationship to the one-way 
broadcast. No more than the your telephone call is technically combined with 
the one-way FM or AM broadcast, for talk radio.

In this example you are technically correct; just two communications networks 
working together to create a popular service. But it is the combination of 
these networks that adds economic value. Hence a network of networks that 
facilitate modern communications.

It is also true that you can tie one-way broadcasts together with the two-way 
Internet in a very real technical sense, as in the examples I have provided. 
And the ATSC is currently working on standards that may do EXACTLY that.


Now, when I watch true Internet TV, that's an entirely different matter. If 
an ad plays and I'm interested in learning more, I click on whatever, get 
more info, and then seamlessly get back to the show. Of course, this works 
only with on demand viewing.

I do exactly the same thing. I just use the tablet in my lap instead of the TV 
to search the Internet. No need to interrupt the program on the TV. 

But with local caching- a DVR - I can go back to watch something again, or 
pause the program. Nothing new here.

Regards
Craig


 
 
----------------------------------------------------------------------
You can UNSUBSCRIBE from the OpenDTV list in two ways:

- Using the UNSUBSCRIBE command in your user configuration settings at 
FreeLists.org 

- By sending a message to: opendtv-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx with the word 
unsubscribe in the subject line.

Other related posts: