[opendtv] Re: Apple, Amazon and Google want to stream NFL games | ZDNet

  • From: Craig Birkmaier <brewmastercraig@xxxxxxxxxx>
  • To: opendtv@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
  • Date: Sat, 06 Feb 2016 08:06:48 -0500

On Feb 5, 2016, at 9:39 PM, Manfredi, Albert E <albert.e.manfredi@xxxxxxxxxx> 
wrote:

The article cannot more directly prove that the owners of this content, yes 
even sports, WANT their content to be IP streamed. And that service providers 
want to play. Because they know that this is where their audience is.

Really?

From the article:

Yahoo claimed the matchup, available for free, from London between the 
Buffalo Bills and the Jacksonville Jaguars garnered 15.2 million unique 
viewers. The game between the Bills and Jacksonville had an average 
viewership per minute of 2.36 million.

To compare, afternoon and evening NFL games on TV average 10 to 20 million 
viewers per minute. It's not clear how beneficial a streaming deal would be 
for the big tech giants. 


Clearly the majority of the audience is watching NFL games on TVs.

I agree that there is ALSO a streaming audience. This past season I streamed 
several college football games on Watch ESPN when I was mobile. No doubt cord 
cutters made up a percentage of the 2.36 million viewers per minute who 
streamed the Bills/Jacksonville game.

"The National Football League is looking to sell rights to stream Thursday 
night games online. Big tech names Apple, Amazon, Google, and Verizon are 
expected to try and purchase the rights, according to a report from Variety."

Yup. And why are they interested in doing this?

MONEY.

The NFL already makes billions licensing the broadcast and MVPD rights to its 
games. They will likely make a few billion more licensing the streaming rights. 
The Verizon wireless deal for exclusive rights to stream NFL games to 
smartphones through 2017, is valued at $1 billion. 

In case you have not noticed Bert, Netflix and Amazon have paid the content 
congloms billions for the rights to stream their library content.

Nobody is saying that there is not a streaming market. It is just another 
entertainment choice that is complementary to broadcast and MVPD distribution.

"It's worth noting CBS and NBC stream their games over the Internet to paid 
TV subscribers, though an Internet streaming deal could give the Internet 
generation -- and cord cutters -- a place to view the games."

There you go, Craig. This would fit quite nicely with IP-based TV interface 
standards, for use in or out of garden walls.

Once again Bert, follow the money. Most of the companies paying to stream NFL 
games are either selling this service like Netflix and Amazon, or using these 
games to get subscribers to buy more services, like Verizon.

Just want to make you absorbed this, before claiming again that obtaining 
streaming rights is an impossible task. If the owners want this, no one will 
stop them.

Give it up Bert. I have never said it is impossible to license streaming 
rights. Netflix has been doing it for years. I have said that it is necessary 
to license these rights - for example, TV stations cannot stream most of the 
programs they broadcast as they do not own the streaming rights.

And at least for now, Apple and others have not been able to license a subset 
of the content offered in the MVPD bundles at any price. 

Maybe someday...

Regards
Craig

Other related posts: