[opendtv] Re: Another CES report

  • From: Tom Barry <trbarry@xxxxxxxxxxx>
  • To: opendtv@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
  • Date: Sun, 13 Jan 2008 10:38:06 -0500



Craig Birkmaier wrote:
> Unfortunately, most local TV stations don;t have many skills when it
> comes to developing content locally with mass audience appeal.

It is more than just lack of skills.  They also lack economy of scale.

By definition any local audience is a much smaller market than a national or international one.

If you are allowed to spend only so many $'s (cents?) per viewer then reaching a 1000x larger audience also gives you vast multiples of budget to work with. With a few exceptions, local broadcasters content just cannot compete effectively in this arena. This part is not their fault or mostly their job responsibility anymore.

Now that a world full on non-local content is easily available due to modern information technology I don't think it is feasible to compete with mostly local content. The world has gotten smaller, and moved past that. It is now just too cheap to import content from everywhere else.

- Tom


At 6:29 PM -0500 1/12/08, Albert Manfredi wrote:

Makes a lot of sense. My only question is how come this makes sense to CE manufacturers, and yet built-in OTA/cable/DBS receivers didn't make sense. Not without FCC mandates.


Because most consumers do not want or need that ATSC tuner and will never use it. It remains to be seen whether consumers will want built-in PVRs and Internet connections, but these features are being offered as options, not being forced down consumer's throats.

The only difference I can come up with is that there is no monolithic entity out there that controls Internet TV distribution, so no one to make deals under the table to keep what should be drop-dead obvious from happening.


There has been intense pressure at all levels to keep the Internet from becoming a bypass technology for the current mass media oligopoly. All that has changed, is that the electronics manufacturers have caught on to the game, and now they are cutting deals with the conglomerates to bypass the traditional content distribution infrastructure.


 No doubt the media conglomerates will survive this
 transition in some diminished form, but the future for
 local broadcasters and what Bert calls the umbillcal
 services is not looking so bright.


I thought you had coined that term.

Actually, though, what you said about cable and DBS incorporating OTA receivers in their STBs to tell local broadcasters to "shove it" should be EXCELLENT news for OTA broadcasting. IMO, this would be the sort of catalyst required for a good OTA DTT network to evolve.


Time will tell. The major problem is that the current OTA services are heavily dependent on the content oligopoly for the stuff you want to watch. If the content community chooses to go direct to the consumer via the Internet, what will local broadcasters deliver?

Unfortunately, most local TV stations don;t have many skills when it comes to developing content locally with mass audience appeal.


As I see it, things are looking up.


We agree, but for completely different reasons...

Regards
Craig


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Tom Barry                  trbarry@xxxxxxxxxxx  



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