[opendtv] Re: 11 years after

  • From: Mike Tsinberg <Mike@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • To: "opendtv@xxxxxxxxxxxxx" <opendtv@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Tue, 6 Nov 2012 19:10:19 +0000

So what is the most reliable communication technology during massive disasters? 
During Fukushima disaster in Japan my friends told me email and internet was 
the most stable. 

Best Regards,
Mike Tsinberg
http://keydigital.com




> -----Original Message-----
> From: opendtv-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx [mailto:opendtv-
> bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Kon Wilms
> Sent: Tuesday, November 06, 2012 1:45 PM
> To: opendtv@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
> Subject: [opendtv] Re: 11 years after
> 
> On Tue, Nov 6, 2012 at 5:37 AM, Craig Birkmaier <craig@xxxxxxxxx>
> wrote:
> > Did public safety communications networks and commercial wireless
> > services get the job done this time?
> >
> > Is broadcast television playing a role in areas that have lost power
> > and cable TV services?
> 
> Soapbox time.
> 
> I spent 1999-2004 working on the CAP/OASIS standard (CAP is now the new
> EAS, per se) and a fully working data broadcast based responder system.
> We basically offered it up to the government for free. But the
> companies in the responding sector that make a business by latching to
> the Government gravy train didn't like that.
> 
> I've seen in-fighting before but the amount I saw in the responder
> sector (by committee members, companies, and even between agencies like
> DOJ and FEMA -- both of which were about as sharp as a brick when it
> came to technology) took the cake. I had people from a certain large
> company in the sector (starts with an H, ends with a well) take my
> business cards and throw them in the trash after a large presentation.
> I'm going to say it was probably because these companies had absolutely
> no fucking clue about how to build anything than 20 year old
> technology, so their best bet was to steal and block while they got
> themselves up to speed with their own products.
> 
> I know people that 12 years later are still trying to push out their
> products to this sector. It's a complete and utter waste of time,
> unless you enjoy running a small business that goes bankrupt. Good
> thing that 'standard' communication lines like Twitter and consumer
> cell data apps are pulling the rug out from under these clowns, I must
> say.
> 
> Cheers
> Kon
> 
> 
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