[minima] Re: Finally getting around to building my Minima...

  • From: allison <ajp166@xxxxxxxxxxx>
  • To: minima@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
  • Date: Sat, 01 Apr 2017 18:52:16 -0400

Lately I have been playing with Atlas 210X traceivers and they use
switched frequency VFOs
with the 10M range going to 23mhz.  With good temperature compensation
they are
amazingly stable.  Granted many made it from the factory with poor
temperature compensation
but I have two that will hold within 100hz an hour after 10 minutes at
room temperature.

I also have a SSB 6M VHF radio with a 14mhz VFO that is good enough
after 10 minutes
stay within 100hz.  it only takes a bit  of trial and effort.  And a
crystal calibrator so you
can hear the drift.

Most of the VFOs I've seen are uncompensated and tuned with a varicap
and they
all drifted downward in frequency at the rate of 200-2000hz over ten minutes
often worse and never hit a stable stopping point.    Most tended to
slow their
rate of drift but were always going downward and were also very temperature
sensitive.  The original  BITX20 before compensating was exactly this.

Things to remember with VFOs:
   Toroids have a temperature coefficient -6 (yellow) or -7 are best for
this.
   The common t50-6 (yellow) toroid is around +35ppm/degree C.  A ceramic
    form is better but hard to find and compensation is still needed. 

  Varicap doides are terrible for temperature and will add to the Varicap.
    Depending on the specific diode chosen and the tuning bias its
temperature
    vs capcitance is in the range of 35-700 ppm/degree C also positive. 
If your
    able to do a good mechanical cap and dial try it if not a varicap
will be
    a compromise that can be compensated for only over part of the range.

See ap note on this from Motorola amp note AN551 available at:

http://web.itu.edu.tr/pazarci/pll/Motorola_AN551_Varactor.pdf

  The Q of the coil is important but also the Q of the capcitor and
Varicaps have
  poor Q compared to fixed caps of reasonable quality and air variables.

  Choice of device and circuit constants are important but the Hartly and
   Armstrong are often used.  Vacker and Seiler designs can be as stable
   as the LC used.   But the LC has to have a near zero temp coefficient.

When using Varicaps I find I have to use larger values of N750 (negative
750ppm)
caps to compensate where using a real variable cap required far less
effort to
stabilize.  Components count.

Also a hint never use ceramic X5F caps anywhere in VFOs or VCOs they are at
best cast mud and far from stable, they are fine for general bypass but
VFOs
require a better part for best result.

Huff&puff is an interesting solution to get excellent stability but it
is better to
first stabilize the problem at least some.  IF stabilized well enough then
fewer parts and no power drain from H&P added.


Allison


On 03/31/2017 10:30 PM, José A. Amador Fundora wrote:

Perhaps, as commercial radios do, split the range between several
VCO's. It won't be as simple, but perhaps more manageable in practice.

There is a russian book about a homebrew transceiver that uses a
single VFO in the VHF range, and dividers to get the heterodyne signal
on the range it is needed. No VFO switching, which makes it rock
solid, but rather divider ratio change.

My Motorola MICOM-XL uses a VCO up to 360 MHz for 30 MHz which is
quite quiet phase-noise wise.

73,

Jose, CO2JA


On 31/03/2017 10:57, Joe Rocci wrote:
Also...
 
The open-loop stability of the oscillator, especially the 7-20 range,
will probably be too poor for the huff-puff to keep up and
microphonics will undoubtedly be an issue. Overall, a very daunting
project in my estimation.
 
*From:* Ashhar Farhan
*Sent:* Friday, March 31, 2017 11:24 AM
*To:* minima@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
*Subject:* [minima] Re: Finally getting around to building my Minima...
 
A simpler scheme than the Si570 is to use a lower frequency IF like
11 MHz. 
Make a solid JFET VFO in a shielded box that has two sections, one
that goes from 3 MHz to 7 MHz, the other that goes from 7 MHz to 20
MHz. Then, just add a very simple Huff and Puff.
This scheme may look basic, it is not. The phase noise of such a
system will beat the best of the radios on the market.
It is not exactly easy either. First, you need a very nice tuning
capacitor with slow motion drive. Next, you will need good mechanical
skills to build the VFO.
 
- f
 
On Fri, Mar 31, 2017 at 7:59 PM, Mark Pilant <mark@xxxxxxxxx> wrote:

    My plan all along has been to try different mixers.  First the
    KISS mixer,
    then a Mini-Circuits ADE-1, and finally the FST3253.  I'm sure it
    will be
    an interesting exercise.

    73

    - Mark  N1VQW

 


-- 
MSc. Ing. Jose Angel Amador Fundora
Profesor Auxiliar
Departamento de Telecomunicaciones y Telemática
Facultad de Ingenieria Eléctrica, CUJAE
Calle 114 #11901 e/ Rotonda y Ciclovía
Marianao 11500, La Habana, Cuba
Tel: +53 7266-3445
Email: amador at electrica.cujae.edu.cu 

Other related posts: