[lptv] Re: Remote Live Feeds...

  • From: Gil Reynolds <gil@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • To: lptv@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
  • Date: Fri, 20 Nov 2020 22:45:23 -0600

Jon,

That's one reason why I have my own server as you never know if an away
game school's internet will block facebook or youtube.

We however have a static ip so don't need to use a dynamic domain name.

Another good thing to have is having a remote connection to your
Masterplay. Of course I have the live stream set for 4 hours on the
schedule, but If we end late or end early. I remote in and either extend
the time. Or just stop the live event when it's over with so there isn't
any dead air and it can go back to network. We use chrome remote desktop,
but used to use TeamViewer.




Gil Reynolds
VP / Station Manager

Hometown Television:
XL7-TV (K07XL Mtn. Home)
K26-TV (K26GS Harrison)
Over the Air - Ch 26 | COX – Ch 843 | Suddenlink – Ch 22 | Ritter – Ch 22,
26.1-26.7 | Yelcot - Ch 70-75 | Natco - Ch 27-33

1226 Commerce Drive
Mountain, Home, AR 72653
Office: 870-424-6957
Cell 870-391-6060
HometownTV.net

 



On Fri, Nov 20, 2020, 1:55 PM Jon C. Moon <jonmoon@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx> wrote:

My setup is very similar, Gil.  However, I'm using a Raspberry Pi with
NGINX media server software to catch my live stream.  Instead of an
external decoder box, NGINX sends the stream to the onboard OMXPlayer for
decoding the video out of the HDMI port.  The software also redirects the
live stream to YouTube.

One of the reasons I brought up StreamLink is I've had some folks ask
about how to do live streaming.  The method you and I utilize works great,
but it does require a station either have a static IP address or DNS
service.  Using a free streaming service like YouTube and StreamLink might
be a bit easier for station owners who might not have quite as much
technical expertise.

Also, I just ran into a situation last night where it would have been
really handy.  I was streaming an away football game and while they had
great internet connectivity, the school was blocking a lot of web sites -
including the web address for my dynamic DNS site.  I was able to stream
directly to YouTube as that was not blocked, but was unable to have the
game live on my channel.  Had StreamLink been loaded on my Raspberry Pi I
could have used it to grab the stream from YouTube. Unfortunately, I didn't
have enough time to make those changes!!

And, yes, it would be interesting to see if StreamLink could send a
YouTube stream to MasterPlay.  If not, that might be something they need to
develop.  YouTube's quality is great and you can't beat free!!

In addition, stations might be able to use this to pick up a few live
steams on YouTube for additional programming - NASA's live channel, for
example.  It's free to use and no copyright issues - and it could be an
easy way for stations to satisfy E/I requirements (run a few hours
overnight or early morning).  A few government-owned news channels are live
streaming on YouTube, like France 24 (English) and DW, and possible can be
broadcast (Several broadcast stations air France 24).

Jon C. Moon
Ridgeline TV Channel 99
706-897-0872
www.ridgelinetv.net

On Nov 20, 2020, at 9:52 AM, Gil Reynolds <gil@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx> wrote:

We used to do something similar to this 10 years ago before Masterplay had
the capability to open up HLS, RTMP, RTMPS, or M3U8 files with an amino box
set to open an RTMP stream from a local media server.  We would begin
streaming to the server and then just tell the amino box to reboot. it was
programmed to automatically connect to the stream upon startup.  Then we
would just set our schedule to switch to the Amino input on the switcher at
a specific time.

We basically do the same thing now with our live broadcasts (football,
morning programs, LIVE parades, etc...) but with the Masterplay set to open
up a link from a local media server . We use Wowza now as it has the
ability to restream the stream that is sent to youtube and facebook at the
same time... but used to use Unreal Media Server which is free.

I remember in the past trying the same thing Jon but with another command
line program (I think it was youtube-dl) to grab the LIVE url to open with
an amino... It did work, but was very inconsistent and the stream would
freeze and the amino would stop playing the LIVE stream.  I have not tried
to open a youtube link with youtube-dl with a Masterplay.  I might try a
test stream with StreamLink and see if it will open up a live stream in
Masterplay.

Anyone not streaming to youtube and wanting to only send it locally for a
live link back to the studio.  You can use Unreal Media Server which is
what we used for years to stream to and had Masterplay open the stream.
It's free for up to 5 broadcast streams and is flawless after you get it
setup.  It doesn't require a fast computer,  I think we had it on a 5 year
old dual core pentium computer.
http://umediaserver.net/umediaserver/download.html

Gil Reynolds
VP / Station Manager

Hometown Television:
XL7-TV (K07XL Mtn. Home)
K26-TV (K26GS Harrison)
Over the Air - Ch 26 | COX – Ch 843 | Suddenlink – Ch 22 | Ritter – Ch 22,
26.1-26.7 | Yelcot - Ch 70-75 | Natco - Ch 27-33

1226 Commerce Drive
Mountain, Home, AR 72653
Office: 870-424-6957
Cell 870-391-6060
HometownTV.net <http://www.hometowntv.net/>





On Wed, Nov 18, 2020 at 7:30 PM Jon C. Moon <jonmoon@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
wrote:

Recently there was some discussion here about how different stations are
able to send live feeds through the public internet to their stations,
whether for sports, news or special event programming.

Now, here's an idea that might be helpful:

There's a free little command line program called "StreamLink" which can
be used to receive live streams from a number of popular streaming
services.  The program then "pipes" the stream data over to your default
media player for playout.  In particular, the program works directly with
live streams on YouTube, which is great because live streaming on YouTube
is pretty easy to do and, best of all, is absolutely FREE!

While you could just use a typical computer and web browser to play out a
live You Tube feed, that can be problematic...some computers don't have
HDMI output, ads, notifications and popups can show up, etc.

Here's a potentially better (and probably cheaper) solution:

StreamLink will run on the Raspberry, Pi, a tiny, little credit
card-sized computer that costs about $40 and has excellent video decoding
and output through HDMI.  After typing in the URL (web address) of the live
stream, the stream is sent to VLC player, where it can be automatically
output fullscreen through the Raspberry Pi's HDMI connector - no menu,
controls, etc.

I've tried this method with a few of the live streams at YouTube - ABC
News and NASA, for example - and it worked really well.  If you're familiar
with scripting, I imagine this probably could be automated to run at
certain times.

Jon C. Moon
Ridgeline TV Channel 99
706-897-0872
www.ridgelinetv.net



Other related posts: