[lit-ideas] Re: [lit-ideas]

  • From: david ritchie <profdritchie@xxxxxxxxx>
  • To: lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
  • Date: Mon, 6 Aug 2018 14:18:57 -0700



On Aug 6, 2018, at 9:20 AM, adriano paolo shaul gershom palma 
<palmaadriano@xxxxxxxxx> wrote:

luckily nothing suggests nothing.
in latin the (word-notion) for property derives from the idea of enclosures 
for cattle, here, e.g. merriam and webster



Pecuniary first appeared in English in the early 16th century and comes from 
the Latin word pecunia, which means "money." Both this root and Latin 
peculium, which means "private property," are related to the Latin noun for 
cattle, pecus. In early times, cattle were viewed as a trading commodity (as 
they still are in some parts of the world), and property was often valued in 
terms of cattle. Pecunia has also given us impecunious, a word meaning 
"having little or no money," while peculium gave us peculate, a synonym for 
"embezzle." In peculium you might also recognize the word peculiar, which 
originally meant "exclusively one's own" or "distinctive" before acquiring 
its current meaning of "strange."


Thank you again.  This is all that comes to mind by way of quasi-literary 
response:  “That is the problem with governments these days. They want to do 
things all the time; they are always very busy thinking of what things they can 
do next. That is not what people want. People want to be left alone to look 
after their cattle.” 
― Alexander McCall Smith 
<https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/4738.Alexander_McCall_Smith>, The No. 1 
Ladies' Detective Agency <https://www.goodreads.com/work/quotes/826298>



as for cheese I have no idea and no interest, I ate once pecorino and it 
sucks, like any and all roman gastronomy




Where, just out of curiosity, does gastronomy not suck?  Sicily, Lyon, 
Capetown, Shanghai…?

David Ritchie,
Foodcartlandia

Other related posts: