[lit-ideas] Re: [lit-ideas]

  • From: Omar Kusturica <omarkusto@xxxxxxxxx>
  • To: lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
  • Date: Sun, 15 Feb 2015 15:08:06 +0100

Did Ezra Pound know Gonville ? And was Gonville in any way related to
Mursili the Hittite ?

O.K.

On Sun, Feb 15, 2015 at 2:59 PM, Adriano Palma <Palma@xxxxxxxxxx> wrote:

> So frigging no body
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: lit-ideas-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx [mailto:
> lit-ideas-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of dmarc-noreply@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
> Sent: 15 February 2015 15:53
> To: lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
> Subject: [lit-ideas] Re: The retreat to commitment
>
> In a message dated 2/15/2015 3:18:33 A.M. Eastern Standard Time,
> Palma@xxxxxxxxxx writes in reply to Geary's reference to "Gonville and
> Caius and  I will reply straightaway"
>
> >Who is gonville?
>
> I'm sure Palma was perhaps confused that Geary meant to reply about  both
> Gonville and Caius.
>
> Caius we more or less all know about.
>
> But, as Palma asks,
>
> >Who is [G]onville?
>
> There were many Gonvilles. The one W. W. Bartley, III, refers to in his
> brilliant "The retreat to commitment" is Edmund Gonville.
>
> He was the second son of William Gonville, a Frenchman. In French, 'ville'
> means 'ville' (as in "Nashville, Tennessee"), and "gon" means "gon".
> William  Gonville's first-born son was Nicholas Gonville, who married into
> the Lerling  family. (William Gonville owned the Manor of Lerling).
>
> Gonville is best known for having founded what is now known as "Gonville
> and Caius" that Bartley refers to.
>
> Those who know Gonville and Caius find Gonville and Caius overinformative
> and refer to Gonville and Caius as Caius which is, to say the least (or
> nevertheless, as Geary prefers) unfair to Gonville.
>
> Other than founding what would later be called Gonville and Caius (or
> simply Caius), Gonville had previously founded two religious institutions,
> Rushworth, and The Hospital of St John, at Lynn.
>
> The origin of his wealth is obscure. Some say it derived from his father;
> some from his mother, and some elsewhere, but he was locally known as
> 'wealthy  Gonville'.
>
> Gonville worked for Edward III, King of England, in some useful capacity.
> Among his jobs, it was that of lending money to the King (or 'mony', as it
> was  then spelt).
>
> In return for the 'mony', Gonville was rewarded with appointment as king's
> clerk -- pronounced clark -- a post later known as Secretary of State --
> vide  Hillary Clinton (and John Kerry -- the first secretary of state
> 'across the  pond' from Gonville was Jefferson, whom Ezra Pound admired
> (Ref.:
> "Negli  anni di Rapallo pubblicò via via i volumi contenenti i canti 31-41
> ("Jefferson")).
>
> Supported (morally) by Sir Walter Manny, Gonville petitioned Edward III to
> set up what would later become Gonville and Caius (or Caius) -- The number
> of  members of Gonville and Caius was set to "20" only. The king agreed,
> and  permission was granted by Edward III who issued the Letters patent.
>
> Bartley is right in being grateful to Gonville and Caius.
>
> The retreat of commitment owes a lot to Gonville and Caius (or  Caius).
>
> Cheers,
>
> Speranza
>
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------
> To change your Lit-Ideas settings (subscribe/unsub, vacation on/off,
> digest on/off), visit www.andreas.com/faq-lit-ideas.html
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------
> To change your Lit-Ideas settings (subscribe/unsub, vacation on/off,
> digest on/off), visit www.andreas.com/faq-lit-ideas.html
>

Other related posts: