[lit-ideas] Re: conference on hypothesis testing

  • From: Judith Evans <judithevans001@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • To: lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
  • Date: Fri, 15 Jul 2011 20:48:41 +0100 (BST)

Y and w are both vowels (both considered vowels) in Welsh.  

Judy Evans, Cardiff


  

--- On Fri, 15/7/11, John Wager <jwager@xxxxxxxxxx> wrote:

> From: John Wager <jwager@xxxxxxxxxx>
> Subject: [lit-ideas] Re: conference on hypothesis testing
> To: lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
> Date: Friday, 15 July, 2011, 20:29
> Donal McEvoy wrote:
> > Try all you like but they seem hellbent on examining
> 'What is it like to be the only gay in the village and use
> 'w' as a vowel?',
> 
> 
> When I was in second grade, I distinctly remember being
> taught the vowels by making a hand-outline on my newsprint
> paper and writing A-E-I-O-U on all the finger tips, and then
> writing W and Y on the heel of the hand.  But years
> later, I realized that only "Y" was REALLY a vowel, and
> couldn't see why in the world I had remembered both W and
> Y.  Was it my first confirmed faulty memory example?
> Was I mis-taught in Pennsylvania? Was there some secret that
> only my second grade teacher knew that nobody else
> knew?  My "hypothesis" is that there is a problem
> somewhere; this is fairly easy to test, at least.  But
> now you have given me a new hypothesis to test: Perhaps my
> second
> grade teacher was Welsh!!! Or at least realized English
> included the possibility of using "W" as a vowel, in some
> localities?  Is "W" really a vowel in Welsh? Or is this
> also just some kind of weird dream from my past?
> 
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