[lit-ideas] Re: Witters & Sons - serious jokes, Hot Ziggety!

  • From: "Donal McEvoy" <dmarc-noreply@xxxxxxxxxxxxx> (Redacted sender "donalmcevoyuk" for DMARC)
  • To: "lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx" <lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Fri, 3 Mar 2017 20:50:50 +0000 (UTC)

My wife gave him some Swiss cheese and rye bread for lunch, which he greatly 
liked. Thereafter he more or less insisted on eating bread and cheese at all 
meals, largely ignoring the various dishes that my wife prepared. Wittgenstein 
declared that it did not much matter to him what he ate, so long as it always 
remained the same. When a dish that looked especially appetizing was brought 
to the table, I sometimes exclaimed "Hot Ziggety!" — a slang phrase that I 
learned as a boy in Kansas. Wittgenstein picked up this expression from me. It 
was inconceivably droll to hear him exclaim "Hot Ziggety!" when my wife put 
the bread and cheese before him.   
   - Norman Malcolm, in Ludwig Wittgenstein : A Memoir (1966), p. 85>



      From: Donal McEvoy <dmarc-noreply@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
 To: "lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx" <lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx> 
 Sent: Friday, 3 March 2017, 20:37
 Subject: [lit-ideas] Re: Witters & Sons - more re serious jokes
   
Also from W's Wikiquote:
"Never stay up on the barren heights of cleverness, but come down into the 
green valleys of silliness."
"Don't for heaven's sake, be afraid of talking nonsense! But you must pay 
attention to your nonsense."
"Nothing is more important than the formation of fictional concepts, which 
teach us at last to understand our own."
There is also the PI remark: "My aim is: to teach you to pass from a piece of 
disguised nonsense to something that is patent nonsense."  ( § 464)
Well "patent nonsense" is likely to be taken for joking but, in reverse, what 
might be taken for joking might be a way of revealing disguised nonsense.
DL



      From: Donal McEvoy <dmarc-noreply@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
 To: "lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx" <lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx> 
 Sent: Friday, 3 March 2017, 19:25
 Subject: [lit-ideas] Re: Witters & Sons - serious jokes
  
McEvoy was arguing that the say/show distinction permeates (if that's the 
word) ALL of Witters's philosophy.>
Yes, though W would prefer it if my posts were just showing rather than 
arguing. One central argument is that once we accept TLP is permeated by the 
showing/saying distinction it becomes implausible PI is not also permeated - it 
is very implausible W would have rejected saying/showing without saying 
anything about this, but it plausible (as Monk argues) that W retreated in PI 
from even attempting to 'say' what can only be shown.

"A serious and good philosophical work could be written consisting entirely of 
jokes."
Though pasted from Wikiquotes, these words from W are (I think) serious, and 
provide a useful stepping-off point for understanding PI: its textures and 
spirit. 

We have touched on the absurdity of the W's apple-table and W's 'tools with 
marks' on them, and to this might be added many other PI 'items' like the 
'beetle in a box' and also the person trying to define their sensations 
'privately'. The whole text is a sequence of serious "jokes", beginning with 
the elaborate opening set-piece based on some writing from St. Augustine: for 
the whole 'Augustinian' picture of language acquisition is at one level 
entirely and immediately understandable to us yet absurd - and it is both these 
things because we can readily understand that words can name objects yet we 
cannot properly express in language what constitutes this 'naming' as opposed 
to some other linguistic act. 

Our understanding is so primed that when presented with Augustine's picture we 
might think the naming of objects is constituted by something expressed by the 
picture, whereas for W (when properly understood) Augustine' picture shows 
'naming' but does not express it. Does W say this: no, he presents Augustine's 
picture to show what W takes to be correct.
 Why start with naming? Why not commanding or promising? It is not simply 
because 'naming' provides the language-reality nexus in TLP but because it 
seems the simplest way words can hook on to objects: if this relation has a 
sense that can only be shown, then the ground is laid for seeing this is true 
for any kind of sense. The opening of PI makes a start at laying this ground. 

Like MM I take W to be a kind of Kantian but among my reservations about her 
paper is that I am not sure W can have his views in PI readily converted into 
Kantian terms like 'a priori' and 'a posteriori' etc or converted into anything 
about 'depth grammar' that sounds programmatic .   

DL


      From: "dmarc-noreply@xxxxxxxxxxxxx" <dmarc-noreply@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
 To: lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx 
 Sent: Friday, 3 March 2017, 0:50
 Subject: [lit-ideas] Re: Witters & Sons
  
-- and daughters, shall we say (cfr. "The daughters of the revolution").

McEvoy has provided some brilliant exegesis of his way of taking McGinn's 
(that's Marie) exegesis of the alleged continuity of Witters.

We were wondering if a philosopher's philosophy needs to show continuity.

Grice did! I mean, his philosophy does. He says he owes this to his father, a 
nonconformist. And it's easy to be born a non-conformist and die one. ("Once a 
non-conformist always a non-conformist").

With Witters, a philosopher senior to Grice, the case may be more complicated.

McEvoy was arguing that the say/show distinction permeates (if that's the word) 
ALL of Witters's philosophy.

Marie McGinn (a 'daughter' of Witters, as we may call her) deals not to much 
with the "Tractatus" and the "Philosophical Investigations," as McEvoy does, 
but with the "Tractatus" and "On Certainty". She spends some time with things 
like G. E. Moore's

i. This is a hand.

ii. I know this is a hand.

and so forth. McGinn, as opposed to McEvoy, also makes a correspondence between

-- what is say

and

-- what is show

(if I understood McGinn alright) in terms of 'knowledge'. "What is said" (the 
dictum, to use Hare's phrase) would be part of one's theoretical knowledge. 
What is shown -- (I wish I had a Latinism alla "dictum" here) is more part of 
some 'practical knowledge', as displayed in how we use lingo.

McGinn spends some time on the nature of analytic propositions. Consider:

iii. Either I know this is a hand or I don't.

As McGinn notes, the logical form of this is

iv. p v ~p

i.e. an analytic proposition which comes out as tautologous in Witters's tables 
--. This a-priority can for McGinn only be shown (or as I would prefer, 
expressed in a lingo OTHER than the object-language), not SAID in the 
object-language.

Unfortunately, McGinn does not use the object-language/meta-language 
distinction that Russell focuses on in his "Intro" to Witters's tractatus. But 
perhaps then Russell would agree with J. L. Austin:

"Some like Witters, but Moore's MY man."

McGinn's main references are Conant and Diamond -- and I believe in the essay 
in question there is only ONE quotation from the "Philosophical 
Investigations." McGinn does not provide (or does not seem to provide) textual 
evidence for Witters's use of 'show' in his later philosophy. 

But what McGinn doesn't show she does seem to tell! 

Cheers,

Speranza

   

   

   

Other related posts:

  • » [lit-ideas] Re: Witters & Sons - serious jokes, Hot Ziggety! - Donal McEvoy