[lit-ideas] Re: Witters & Sons

  • From: "" <dmarc-noreply@xxxxxxxxxxxxx> (Redacted sender "jlsperanza" for DMARC)
  • To: lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
  • Date: Sat, 18 Feb 2017 19:30:40 -0500

Thanks to McEvoy for his further commentary.

We are considering a passage in "PI" -- No, that's not the life of an infamous 
number, but short for "Philosophische Untersuchungen". In German, "I" becomes 
"U," and vice versa.

The passage from "PI" we are considering is, to wit (or to Witters, if you 
mustn't):

"[T]hink of the following use of language: I send someone shopping. I give him 
a slip marked 'five red apples'. He takes the slip to the shopkeeper, who opens 
the drawer marked 'apples', then he looks up the word 'red' in a table and 
finds a colour sample opposite it; then he says the series of cardinal 
numbers—I assume that he knows them by heart—up to the word 'five' and for each 
number he takes an apple of the same colour as the sample out of the drawer.—It 
is in this and similar ways that one operates with words—"But how does he know 
where and how he is to look up the word 'red' and what he is to do with the 
word 'five'?" Well, I assume that he acts as I have described. Explanations 
come to an end somewhere.—But what is the meaning of the word 'five'? No such 
thing was in question here, only how the word 'five' is used."

McEvoy glosses: 

"W[itters] is taking the michael but for a serious point: of course, how would 
the shopkeeper know how 'red' in the message slip correlates with a colour 
sample?"

I think Witters should be straight with Anscombe and accept:

i. He doesn't know.

(This has come to be known as Kripkenstein's answer -- 'the sceptical' one).

McEvoy:

"The answer [to what I take to be Anscombe's question, "How does the 
apple-seller know that 'red' in the slip co-relates with the sample in the 
Periodical Table of Colours the apple-seller keeps in his shop?"] might seem: 
because 'red' is in the [slip] and 'red' is in the table, and they are the same 
'red' with the same meaning. But how does the shopkeeper know all this? And how 
does the shopkeeper know how the 'red' in the note correlates with the colour 
sample (and not the shape in which the colour is depicted)?"

Well, that would have Anscombe asking Witters if he thinks square apples are a 
logical possibility. I assume the shape in which the different (primary, I 
hope) colours are depicted in the Apple-Seller's Periodical Table of Elements 
is 'square'.

McEvoy:







 

"And how does this colour sample correlate with the apple produced - within 
what range or shade of 'red' does there have to be a correspondence so the 
shopkeeper knows he has a 'red' apple within that range? Etc. The questions can 
be multiplied"

Though perhaps not ad infinitum. The apple-seller actually is defined by his 
ability to sell apples, red and green. 

A more important point is whether the apple-seller still has _five_ apples. I 
can imagine that if Wittgenstein's servant (let's call her Lizzie) arrives just 
one minute before the apple-seller is selling the shop, he might just as well 
go (in the appropriate Cambridgeshire accent):

 

ii. Sorry, ma'am. Have just _fo:_ ["four"] apples, not five. But I do have one 
green apple. Would you accept it? Or rather, would your intransigent master 
accept it?

McEvoy:

"[A]nd the so-called procedure does not answer them: the procedure could only 
work if these answers are presupposed. But it is really these answers, and 
nothing in the procedure, that explains how the meaning is arrived at."

Well, I wouldn't substantivise 'meaning' like that. "Meaning" is a verb. When 
we say, as Witters said, "meaning is use" he was being confused. Part of the 
confusion is saved by Ryle in his contribution to a symposium with Findlay, 
repr. in Parkinson ("Theories of meaning," Oxford readings in philosophy"). 
Ryle distinguishes between 'use' and 'usage' and thinks Witters should have 
said that 'meaning is using', since meaning being usage sounds puerile.

So we don't have "Meaning", but we have the apple-seller trying to understand

iii. "Five red apples."

and apparently NOT failing.

McEvoy















"The whole example is absurd"

I'm surprised it came from a full professor of philosophy at Cambridge but 
perhaps I'm not. It was said of Oxford in the days of H. P. Grice that it 
(Oxford) had no competition (Cambridge was deemed far too minor in comparison).

McEvoy:

"and reflects a procedure that would never happen because the correlations and 
understandings necessary (to  'translate' from the [slip] using the colour 
table) would presuppose a level of other knowledge"

to use Anscombe's favourite noun

"which would render any colour table superfluous - as indeed in real life."

Well, if the apple-seller is Daltonic, I don't think a colour table would be 
superfluous. I suppose that if Servant Lizzie KNEW that the apple-seller is 
Daltonic, she would have cleverly changed

iii. "Five red apples"

appropriately into

iv. Five green apples.

Grice considers this. He is teaching French to a little girl. He notices that 
the little girl does not know MUCH French. Grice notices that this little girl 
thinks that a phrase which in French means "Strasbourg is smoggy in the winter" 
means "Help yourself with a piece of cake". Knowing this, Grice utters the 
French for "Strasbourg is smoggy in the winter" thereby meaning that the little 
girl is to help herself with a piece of cake. So, 'red' and 'green' (as applied 
to apples) have different 'usages' when used by Daltonic and other.

McEvoy:


"In other words, the colour table could not realistically supply the meaning of 
'red' because, without adequate other knowledge of the meaning of 'red,' it 
would not be possible to use the table."

On top, it is obtuse to assume that 'red' has meaning. It's utterers when 
uttering things like

v. Snow is red.

who MEAN things. From utterer's meaning we arrive at a meaning of an utterance, 
such as "Snow is red". And from the utterance meaning we arrive at the meaning 
of an utterance part -- such as "red". This is the antithesis of the 
Compositionality Principle that Davidson worshipped but which Grice found 
obtuse.

Strictly, 'red,' qua utterance-part, acquires meaning in terms of something 
like Grice's "Causal Theory of Perception" -- vide Peacocke, "Concept and 
Percept". We need to correlate the utterance-part, 'red', with a qualia, such 
as red is. In the Daltonic utterer, the implicatures diverge, and the sad thing 
is that they are mock implicatures in that the Daltonic utterer may NOT even 
_know_ he is providing a "misusage" of the utterance-part, 'red'. 


McEvoy:




"There is much dry wit of a certain kind in PI, and the above example is just 
one."

Not in vain he was often called "dry Witters". Whereas Grice would have a gin 
and it anyday.

McEvoy:

"Yet many readings of PI read W as if he is flatly stating what he thinks and 
this can be read off his flat statements. The result makes nonsense of W's 
actual point of view."

One wonders what _intention_ Witters had in proffering the "PI" then. I know 
teachers at Cambridge are supposed to _entertain_ tutees (they have SOMETHING 
like the Oxonian tutorial system, only different). And Cambridge is drier than 
Oxford. 

Another wonder is what made Anscombe think that "PI" would sell with Blackwell.

Oddly, the most famous review that "PI" got when Blackwell published it was by 
P. F. Strawson -- review which was repr. by Oscar P. Wood, of Christ Church, in 
a volume NOT published by Blackwell.

Derek Jarman makes a passing reference to "PI" in his film "Wittgenstein". 

vi. Wittgenstein's lover: That's a nice book!
     Wittgenstein: This? It's not even a book! It's a draft.
     Wittgenstein's lover: And should it become a book, how would you call it?
     Wittgenstein: The Blue Book.

The joke is that the spectator can see that the book is not blue and that 
Witters is deceiving his lover: he means "Philosophical Investigations."

For the record, Philosophical Investigations was published posthumously, as 
they say.

Or, as Carrie Fisher would say, posthumorously.

"Philosophische Untersuchungen," as the thing was titled by Witters, was edited 
by Lizzie Anscombe and a Welsh philosopher Rush Rhees.

But it was translated by Anscombe, since Rhees confessed, "My Austrian is poor."

"Philosophische Untersuchungen" comprised two parts. 

Part I, consisting of 693 numbered paragraphs, and it was allegedly ready for 
publishing.


However, this Part I was rescinded from the publisher by Witters himself, in 
the form of a telegraph:

vii. Please don't publish it! 

Part II was added on by the editors, trustees of his Nachlass. 

When Lizzie Anscombe's version became dated (Austrian slang evolves), a new 
edited translation, by a don at Grice's college, St. John's, Peter Michael 
Stefan Hacker and Joachim Schulte (a native German speaker, unlike Hacker), was 
published to great effect.

Part II of the earlier Anscombe translation was labeled in the Hacker-Schulte 
translation "Philosophy of Psychology - A Fragment," and humously referred to 
be Cambridge students as PPF. 

Wittgenstein's handwriting left a lot to be desired -- by Lizzie Anscombe, that 
is. Her typing was very much welcomed by Mr. Blackwell -- who, although a very 
_Oxford_ man -- decided to go on with the publication even if it was by a 
_Cambridge_ philosopher, even if translated by an _Oxford_ philosopher as 
Lizzie Anscombe by then was. 

The book contains illustrations and is now available in paperback.

Cheers,

Speranza

Other related posts: