[lit-ideas] Re: White's Implicature

  • From: "" <dmarc-noreply@xxxxxxxxxxxxx> (Redacted sender "jlsperanza" for DMARC)
  • To: lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
  • Date: Fri, 8 Sep 2017 09:35:47 -0400

For the record, the poem by White in today’s NYT is

summer is over and gone
over and gone -- over and gone
summer is dying, dying.

A purist may allege it’s not a poem. White, as he editorialises on it, uses 
‘sing,’ but I take Dylan to be correct – in his lecture to the Nobel – that if 
you sing, you are a poem – but cfr. Liza Minnelli, “The singer and the song” – 
I think she’s a poet, too, though!

The piece opens with that poem, and White’s editorial of it. The poem, White 
notes, is sung ‘in the grasses;’ it was ‘the song of summer’s ending,’ and 
White grants that it might be a ‘monotonous’ song, i.e. poem. White further 
editorialises that “even the most beautiful days in the whole year — the days 
when summer is changing into autumn,” we have the reciters “spread[ing a] 
rumour of sadness.”

Today’s NYT piece on White ends with that song/poem: “There is a chill in the 
late summer air. And of course there are those depressive crickets, with their 
sadness-and-change routine. Still, White has it right in all his writing about 
seasons and the rhythms of life. For his cottage, for Gallant, for all of us, 
“the warm wind will blow again,” as Charlotte so reassuringly reminds Wilbur.”

Interestingly, since Helm was mentioning the volume, there is a reference to 
Strunk and White, to the effect that, to some, White (who gives McEvoy the “E. 
B. jeeves”) entered the picture with "The Elements of Style" with Charlotte and 
Wilbur remaining what the utterer of the piece calls “strangers.”

Gallant likes to play White’s recording of his own tale – and it’s interesting 
to note that, alla perfect folksong, the “Summer is over and gone” poem White 
his self recites/sings in the Dorian mode! (cfr. Wilde, “The important of being 
Dorian.”)

Cheers,

Speranza

Other related posts: