[lit-ideas] Re: "There's an old saying in Tennessee"

  • From: JulieReneB@xxxxxxx
  • To: lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
  • Date: Tue, 29 Jun 2004 00:12:18 EDT

And here I thought I'd seen ALL the original Star Trek episodes.  Am I the 
only one who thought (and continues to think) Star Trek, Twilight Zone, and 
Mash 
to be classically brilliant?  Remember the Star Trek where the guy is divided 
into two, one evil one good, versions of himself with equal strength?  I 
*think* it was called "Lazarus".  And now we have reality shows.  geeze.
Julie Krueger

========Original Message========
Subj:[lit-ideas] Re: "There's an old saying in Tennessee"
Date:6/28/2004 11:01:30 PM Central Daylight Time
From:cskir@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
To:lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Sent on:    

Perhaps it's a loose translation of an ancient Chinese
> proverb, gradually honed down to a southern phrase.

ck: I don't know about y'all, but I first heard the saying from the mouth of
Chief Engineer Scotty on Star Trek. You can guess where he said it came
from.
Carol


----- Original Message ----- 
From: <JulieReneB@xxxxxxx>
To: <lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Sent: Monday, June 28, 2004 8:10 PM
Subject: [lit-ideas] Re: "There's an old saying in Tennessee"


> I don't have any idea why he considers it (or called it) a saying
identified
> with TN.  It's more (I think) like a piece of Americana.  I would have
> expected it to have originated here, probably somewhere in the south
because it does
> have that flavour.  > Julie Krueger
>
> ========Original Message========
> Subj:[lit-ideas] Re: "There&apos;s an old saying in Tennessee"
> Date:6/28/2004 9:24:34 PM Central Daylight Time
> From:Jlsperanza@xxxxxxx
> To:lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
> Sent on:
>
>
>
> In a message dated 6/28/2004 10:17:22 PM Eastern Standard Time,
> JulieReneB@xxxxxxx writes:
> What  confuses you?  Bush just couldn't
> say it right.  He forgot the  second half
>
> What strikes me as interesting is that he wanted to qualify the expression
> as being 'an old saying in Tennessee' -- was the speech being delivered
> there?
> He then notes he _knows_ it's a saying in Texas.
>
> I would think that the proverb is actually generalized all over the United
> States, and possibly of English origin?
>
> I do not have the Oxford  Dictionary of English proverbs to hand, but the
> post I sent earlier -- with the  online link -- says it's an Oriental
> (Chinese)
> proverb. So what's the source for  believing it's only Tennessee/Texas?
>
> Cheers,
>
> JL
>
>
>
>
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