[lit-ideas] Re: The arrogance of Americans and Marlene Dietrich

  • From: wokshevs@xxxxxx
  • To: wokshevs@xxxxxx
  • Date: Fri, 9 May 2008 14:46:33 -0230

Erratum: He wasn't my "Ancient Greek phil. prof" but rather my Ancient Greek
Philosophy prof.

Walter O.
Loyola in my mind





Quoting wokshevs@xxxxxx:

> I don't have a clue what "ty ty" means but the closest thing to it that I
> can
> recall hearing is an expression my Ancient Greek phil. prof at Loyola
> repeatedly used - something like "to ta ti." Nobody in the class could
> decipher
> the meaning of his behavior, though some intriguing hypotheses were indeed
> put
> forward. (He never did get to be under psychiatric care, as far as I know.)
> The
> utterance was typically accompanied with a fervent pointing gesture,
> although
> the referent seemed to change from one occasion to an other and inexplicably
> so. Sometimes he would point outside the window, sometimes to my pingpong
> racquet and sometimes to a chair or coffee mug or ashtray in the room. Had
> neither rhyme nor reason. One woman in the front row, though, felt she in
> particular was being repeatedly fingered by his ostensive displays and
> dropped
> the course. 
> 
> Strange things happen in philosophy classes.
> 
> Metaphysically, not politically, yours,
> 
> Walter O.
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> Quoting Robert Paul <rpaul@xxxxxxxx>:
> 
> > Lawrence wrote
> > 
> > > After posting my note I realized I had made a mistake in it.  I was only
> 
> > > six when World War II broke out and so even less likely to know what 
> > > ?ty-ty? means.  Maybe Robert Paul who is much older and wiser will 
> > > know.  If I had to guess, I would say it might be a contraction of 
> > > ?hoity-toity.?  The sense of what you quoted would permit hoity-toity ? 
> > > sort of. 
> > 
> > I think Lawrence's suggestion is right: 'hoity-toity,' and 
> > 'highty-tighty' pick out the same concept, although 'hoity-toity' now 
> > seems to be the preferred spelling. It isn't hard to see 'ty ty' as a 
> > weird regional variant of the latter. Despite my age and innocence, I've 
> > never heard an American say 'ty ty' to mean either hoity-toity or 
> > highty-tighty (or to mean anything, for that matter). When I saw the 
> > expression in David's post, I thought of Nöel Coward. Don't ask me why.
> > 
> > Both these hyphenated expressions seem to mean 'arrogant and aloof,' so 
> > I'm not clear why they would be used to explain why Dietrich's looks 
> > were disappointing.
> > 
> > Robert Paul
> > ------------------------------------------------------------------
> > To change your Lit-Ideas settings (subscribe/unsub, vacation on/off,
> > digest on/off), visit www.andreas.com/faq-lit-ideas.html
> > 
> 
> 
> 



------------------------------------------------------------------
To change your Lit-Ideas settings (subscribe/unsub, vacation on/off,
digest on/off), visit www.andreas.com/faq-lit-ideas.html

Other related posts: