[lit-ideas] Re: The Troubadour's Implicature

  • From: "" <dmarc-noreply@xxxxxxxxxxxxx> (Redacted sender "Jlsperanza" for DMARC)
  • To: lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
  • Date: Fri, 19 Feb 2016 07:31:28 -0500

Thanks to Lionpainter for sharing troubadour M. Willis's lovely  
compositions -- 'tropi'. 
 
In a message dated 2/19/2016 6:56:16 A.M. Eastern Standard Time,  
lawrencehelm@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx writes:
I liked the music and sound.  Ever  since Tomita I've been partial to that 
sort of music.
 
As opposed, McEvoy would say, to the clear implicature of 'being total'.  
Loved it. For the record, 
 
Tomita once released an arrangement of Gustav Holst's The Planets (my  
favourite, Jupiter, obviously, especially after it was turned into a hymn!) 
 
Lionpainter wrote: "Modern Troubadour major 5ths and all those other  
loverly chords. Let me know if you enjoyed having me share."
 
Loved it, and cograts to M. Willis.
 

[m]odern troubadour major 5ths and all those other loverly  chords.
 
Indeed. Whereas the ancient troubadour (or as I prefer, pretentiously, the  
'high mediaeval' -- as Geary taught me: "use 'high' whenever you can, and 
even  whenever you can not") one wonders. 
 
There are -- how many? not a few -- high mediaeval troubadour tunes still  
available. One book in Venice includes musical notation. The 'songs' or 
'verse'  (they thought that 'vers', since the Occitan does not pronounce the 
final 's'  when pronounced by a Parisian, was cognate with 'verum', the true) 
were  monophonic, and monadic, with the accompaniment providing God knows. I 
often  wonder if the 'basso continuo' of the later Italians carry an 
implicature. I  guess it does. What is the implicature of harmony, when you 
have 
the vocal line  accompanied by some harmony or other? Surely the minor/major 
distinction makes  sense best in harmonic terms, but one wonders. 
 
It is a good thing the troubadour's favourite musical instrument was the  
lute, while other forms of poets would, say, play the flute. Alcibiades, back 
in  Ancient Greece, notably refused to play the pipes of Pan, saying that 
they would  disfigure what he thought was his lovely face. He _was_ a bit 
conceited.
 
They say that most of the folksongs that Sharp recorded, even in  
Appalachia, were 'vocal' only, no accompaniment (thus, it is voice alone we  
find in 
the soundtrack to "Far from the madding crowd", with Julie Christie --  
folksong "Seeds of Love", but the film composer adds some accompaniment to the  
other, "Bushes and Briars"), but it seems an established fact that the  
troubadour loved the music of harmony which "hath charms", to echo the English  
poet. What would a 'serenata' be without the extra that instrumental harmony 
 brings? 
 
They say that the origin of Italian opera, in the Camerata led by Bardi (of 
 the Medici court), the madrigal had developed into so much polyphony, that 
 nobody could understand the words. Hence opera was viewed by historians as 
a  return to very ancient modes of music (they thought they were 
re-creating the  way the Greek and Roman tragedians had their tragedies 
performed). 
But what I  found of interest is that some arias of early Baroque opera (like 
Arianna's  lamento, in the lost opera by Monteverdi) may well compare to the 
'lamento' of  the troubadour -- it is after all a fixed 'genre'. 
 
I'm less sure about the choir or chorus. Apparently, it was also monodic,  
and 'unison', but it is the chorus where, as Wagner will later shows, vocal  
harmony reigns. And then, as Geary notes, we should NEVER forget the 
Andrews  sisters!
 
Cheers,
 
Speranza
 
 
 
------------------------------------------------------------------
To change your Lit-Ideas settings (subscribe/unsub, vacation on/off,
digest on/off), visit www.andreas.com/faq-lit-ideas.html

Other related posts: