[lit-ideas] Re: The Troubadour's Implicature

  • From: "" <dmarc-noreply@xxxxxxxxxxxxx> (Redacted sender "Jlsperanza" for DMARC)
  • To: lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
  • Date: Thu, 18 Feb 2016 08:33:03 -0500

In a message dated 2/18/2016 1:59:05 A.M. Eastern Standard Time,  
lionpainter@xxxxxxxxx writes: "hear Sam sing " Cryin for the Carolines.""
 
Thanks. It is appropriate to keep the thread, "The Troubadour's  
Implicature", because, as E. M. Forster implicated, all connects.

It has  been said:

"Vige di solito una divisione professionale del lavoro  letterario, 
per cui il trovatore compone, “inventa”, lasciando al giullare la 
FUNZIONE COLLATERALE DI ESECUTORE E DIFFUSORE. La 
separazione tra le due figure non è tuttavia netta, perché non 
mancano esempi di giullari che sono anche compositori e viceversa."
 
Roughly: "There frequently wasa a professional division of literary labour: 
 by which, the troubadour composes, 'invents', leaving to the 'giullare', 
the  co-lateral function of 'performer' or 'promoter'. The separation between 
the two  figures is however not altogether precise, since there is not a 
loss of examples  of 'giullari' who are composers and vice versa.
 
So Sam would be a 'giullare', promoting (never mind performing) the  melody 
of Mr. A. and the lyric of Mr. B. I would think the lyric is more  
important, but as someone told me, not so for amazon.com or others, where it's  
by 
alphabetical order of COMPOSER that musical stuff is listed.

So back to Sam, and what he is doing
 
VERSE I --------------------------- VERSE II 
big town you lured me  ------ small town you've sold me
big town you cured me ----- small town  you'll hold me
tho' others hate to say good-bye to you ---- you said  that I'd done 
nothing but regret
I'm leavin' but I'll never sigh for you  -------------- I've cried the 
blues to ev'ry one I've met
big town  you robbed me of ev'ry joy I knew ------------ small town you 
gave me all  that I'll ever get. 

(Sam, no doubt as advised by dance band leader Ambrose who got all the  
credits, skips this, although the melody is played by the orchestra  alone).
 
Then Sam Browne (a pseudonym, after the name of the gun) comes with his  
A1A2BA3 refrain -- the only thing the crooner was allowed to sing at the 
Mayfair  and other dance hall venues -- too much lyric would kill a dance 
night! 
--
 
And what he does is to perform and promote the 'tropos' of the  
'troubadour': here the tropos seems to be 'ubi sunt'. All the As parts start  
with 
'where is', which pluralises as 'where are', 'ubi sunt'. The implicature:  
nowhere?
 
REFRAIN

-- A1
 
where is the song I had in my heart
that harmonised with  the pines
--- FIXED TWO LINES:
anyone can see what's troublin' me
I'm cryin' for the Carolines

A2
 
where is the brook that kisses the lane
covered with glory vines
--- FIXED TWO LINES REPEATED: 
anyone can see what's troublin' me
cryin' for the Carolines

B: 
 
how can I smile 
mile after mile
there's not a bit of green here
birdies all stay 
far far away
they're seldom ever seen here
 
A3:
 
where is the gal that I used to meet
down where the pale  moon shines
---- FIXED TWO LINES REPEATED FOR A THIRD TIME:
anyone  can see what's troublin' me
I'm crying for the Carolines
 
They say the troubadour is so called because he uses a 'tropos', and while  
this had a special usage in mediaeval liturgy, we seem to see a 'tropos' 
here,  the 'ubi sunt' tropos, "where are"-- Is there a logic to the three 
'items'  mentioned? It seems so:
 
They incease in sentimental intensity. For Sam asks:
 
-- where is the song -- this is important and meaningful from an individual 
 point of view -- the song harmonised with the pines. There was peace 
between the  inner self and the 'environment' or milieu. 
 
The second is strictly 'geographical', and sublime -- a brook kisses the  
lake? Nowhere? No. Back in the Carolines. So, this second 'ubi sunt' focuses 
on  the 'milieu', without whose harmony no song or love lyric would be 
possible. And  surely he can recover the song back there, too.
 
and most notably, the third 'ubi' refers to what the troubadour would have  
as fin'amor -- to whom the song of the first 'ubi' is addressed, we hope:
 
-- where is the gal.
 
An interesting point that one source makes is that that 'gal', in the case  
of the troubadour, was *always* an already married one! -- This may not be 
the  case here, but the fact that they had to meet 'down where the plae moon 
shines'  has a bit of secrecy about it. And she might well be married now, 
unless he  hurries up back!
 
Must say that musically that appeals to me in the song is that it's in the  
Dorian mode (as Geary calls it), i.e. a minor key!
 
Cheers,
 
Speranza




------------------------------------------------------------------
To change your Lit-Ideas settings (subscribe/unsub, vacation on/off,
digest on/off), visit www.andreas.com/faq-lit-ideas.html

Other related posts: