[lit-ideas] Re: The Swan and my gendered writing...

  • From: Judith Evans <judithevans001@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • To: lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
  • Date: Thu, 16 Apr 2009 18:13:58 +0000 (GMT)

its author skips over the fact that we develop personal
> ideals of beauty independent of those offered by media

she would (I do read Tanya Gold fairly often, she's always in The Guardian, and 
this is her kind of thing).  But though of course you're right, I'd say the 
media etc. form our ideas, not so much of beauty as of what a 'star' looks 
like; and that's what's at work with people like the singer.  

> Thus I saw the build-up as a theatre con

I don't think it was.  


I was
> surprised to be in the group moved to tears. 

I was moved to tears too but am, I admit, rather easily moved!

> preparing a cardboard sign, "will work for
> catharsis" 

I'll drink to that

Judy Evans, Cardiff, UK

--- On Thu, 16/4/09, David Ritchie <ritchierd@xxxxxxxxxxxxx> wrote:

> From: David Ritchie <ritchierd@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
> Subject: [lit-ideas] Re: The Swan and my gendered writing...
> To: lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
> Date: Thursday, 16 April, 2009, 6:02 PM
> On Apr 16, 2009, at 8:56 AM, Judith Evans wrote:
> 
> > 
> > 
> > (*it's my impression many people who know more
> about the programme -- Digital Spy helps out here... -- were
> genuinely moved.)
> > 
> The Guardian piece is right to point out that we see a
> wider range of people in real life than we do on television,
> but its author skips over the fact that we develop personal
> ideals of beauty independent of those offered by media--one
> person's skinny ideal might be my idea of horror; we
> live and work among the wide range of normal people, or at
> least I do.  The singer actually reminded me of one of my
> aunts, a lady who was once considered beautiful enough to
> have her image painted on the nose of a Flying Fortress. 
> Thus I saw the build-up as a theatre con--move awkwardly,
> dress awkwardly, stress your age so that the audience will
> be gobsmacked by the beauty of your voice.  But as with any
> such con--we all know how Shakespeare is going to turn
> out--execution is all; the fact that we know we are being
> set up doesn't rob us of catharsis.  That said, I was
> surprised to be in the group moved to tears.  With one or
> two exceptions--and the Miserables isn't among these-- I
> hate musical theater.  So when she said she was going to
> give us the Miserables, I almost stopped the clip.  And then
> I tumbled into the group defined by Chris' first
> excerpt.  Weird.
> 
> David Ritchie,
> preparing a cardboard sign, "will work for
> catharsis" in
> Portland, Oregon
> ------------------------------------------------------------------




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