[lit-ideas] Re: The Split Implicature

  • From: adriano paolo shaul gershom palma <palmaadriano@xxxxxxxxx>
  • To: "lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx" <lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Sat, 21 Oct 2017 18:46:03 +0400

la moglie di speranza all'attacco!
ritorna in scena popper che spiega cosa siano le scienze
ci manca la prestazione di speranza, pare che il tema sia
il trattenimento della grammatica

palma,   apgs





On Sat, Oct 21, 2017 at 1:04 PM, Donal McEvoy <dmarc-noreply@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
wrote:

 >I think, however, by "English middleclass person" you mean the parents
of the fictional character “Bromley” in the film “Pride,” the sort of
people who caused me to think that a trip across the Atlantic and possibly
tarrying awhile might be a fine idea.

Did I mention that “Pride” is a very fine fillum?>

I'll start at the end. I saw "Pride" only this year (Irish* for "for the
first time this year", but also Irish* for "saw it recently"; so I'll add
"for the first time this year"). It was very fine. Like a haiku, and like
most films, that kind of film has to make use of limited forms (most of
which owe themselves to film's supposed need for "dramatic development"):
it developed itself within them in almost impeccable fashion. It compares
favourably to "The Full Monty", which is much better known and occupies a
similar genre (French for "is a similar type of film"). I know, this is
getting irritating.

Bromley's parents are probably too polite, and unengaged with linguistic
point-scoring (they have after all a gay son to save), to be the people I
have in mind. The people I have in mind are more like Professor John Mullan
and his ilk, and their private school chums in the legal profession. And
Oxbridge dons. People further away from the salt than Bromley's parents.
People who think it right to mock people who say "fillum" (friends from
Oxford privately thought this was an affectation or pecularity on my part
until they encountered other Irish people who said it this way: how
narrowminded is that?).

"Grammar" is a strange thing: even seasoned users of a language may have
the experience of encountering a sentence that seems wrong to them,
"grammatically", and yet where they cannot really justify this feeling or
where they may come to accept the sentence is actually perfectly
grammatical. "Grammar" plays a role in clarity, and clarity is important.
Plenty about "grammar" is with Luke and the Force. But there is a dark
side.

However, I am not sure we can blame grammar for the grammatical dark side
- for example, grammatical point-scoring is generally practiced by people
who are minded to find some basis for point-scoring anyway. In fact, in
whom 'games of one-upmanship' seem pathologically embedded. I didn't go to
an English private school but I expect these things were embedded there: as
my ma says "They don't lick it up off the grass."

In wider intellectual culture, the role of "grammar" has become overblown
because of the "linguistic turn" taken in twentieth century philosophy:
this has caused even serious minded and otherwise intelligent people to
think HLA Hart was doing us a tremendous intellectual favour in tracing the
sense of all law within its legal system to its "rule of recognition" - not
asking how we managed to run a legal system for centuries without
recognising any "rule of recognition"; in a parallel development, some
otherwise intelligent people have taken seriously the suggestion, made
variously by AJ Ayer and PF Strawson, that inductive rules in science are
justified inductively by science itself, and the "rules" are established by
whatever science accepts as correct inductive practice *i.e. *there is,
in effect, a "rule of inductive recognition" that underpins the scientific
system. As I have argued on this list *ad nauseum*, these "grammatical"
conceits turn out to be circular, unexplanatory and entirely 'epistemic
fiction'. One of Karl Popper's great achievements was to have cut through
all this bullshit, and give a genuine explanation of how science actually
works* i.e *by the logic of testing.

It's fair to note that Irishism may enrich literature and everyday
language but it has a limited positive role in drafting legal documents,
and I guess in the *formal* 'language of business' generally. This is one
guess: that the formal 'language of business' (*i.e.* government,
commerce, the law) predominated in English *written *culture from the
Industrial Revolution onwards, in a way it did not in agricultural Ireland,
and has left its imprint on the English middle classes: its forms and
constructions have come to predominate what is regarded as 'good
expression', for good and ill. [It also impacts on English literature,
mostly negatively: it may help explain why Pinter is second-rate a writer
compared to Beckett - it's not the just the subject-matter, it's the way of
using language to get at deeper levels where Pinter falls short - but he
was clever enough to know he was comparatively second-rate, and to try to
turn his limitations to advantage, by playing on what goes unsaid in
surface 'formal' language in a way that plays to a gallery of the
middleclass emotionally repressed. Orwell, to take another example, is in
many ways a great writer - and exemplifies English virtues - but in many
ways he's not *i.e.* he has a very thin style, with not much *art* to it].

So no, I don't hold Bromley's parents personally responsible, and actually
think they wouldn't engage in the kind of sneering superiority that would
issue from John Mullan (at least on the occasions when socially I have met
him [btw, with few exceptions, all English people I know find John Mullan
intolerable for the same kind of reason {- he is a person known to enter a
friend's house and his first utterance contain a very loud and
Germanic-sounding use of "*schadenfreunde*"} - admittedly our contact
predates his professorship, and he may have calmed down now he thinks he
has the right kind of status {tho his anti-Dylan swipe suggests
otherwise}]).

But don't start me on the Welsh. I mean I had written up a piece of
research for potential publication** once and showed it to this Welsh
barrister....

Final note, in fairness: the Irish have their share of point-scoring
ninnies too. But that's why we have so many ditches, for their bodies to be
found in.

D
L
*Also English of course
**It was published


------------------------------
*From:* david ritchie <profdritchie@xxxxxxxxx>
*To:* lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
*Sent:* Saturday, 21 October 2017, 2:08
*Subject:* [lit-ideas] Re: The Split Implicature

The point here is that the Irishism softens the directness of "you" alone,
and so is a more friendly form. The redundancy is deliberate and is not
'redundant redundancy' because it impacts on sense. It is obvious that
writers like Joyce and Beckett use a version of English (Beckett preferring
French for a joke on the English) that is continually indebted to such
Irishisms, but what English middleclass person understands this, and its
vitality to their literature?


Me.

Except I, myself, am Scottish by birth and so on, but if you heard my
accent you’d not know that.  I think, however, by "English middleclass
person" you mean the parents of the fictional character “Bromley” in the
film “Pride,” the sort of people who caused me to think that a trip across
the Atlantic and possibly tarrying awhile might be a fine idea.

Did I mention that “Pride” is a very fine fillum?

I last heard someone say fillum when I went to buy colour fillum in a
chemist’s somewhere in Atholl, a name that causes Americans to smile.
Atholl, of course, means “New Ireland,” “ath-fhotla.”  Or so Wikipedia
tells me.

David Ritchie,
Old Oregon.



Other related posts: