[lit-ideas] Re: The Quintessential Popper

  • From: Donal McEvoy <donalmcevoyuk@xxxxxxxxxxx>
  • To: "lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx" <lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Sat, 23 Jan 2016 09:02:00 +0000 (UTC)

 

    >In a message dated 1/22/2016 3:33:32 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,  
donalmcevoyuk@xxxxxxxxxxx writes:
"It is true that some critics of Popper,  like Ayer, took Popper as 
proposing his 'demarcation criterion' as a criterion  of meaning when Popper 
never 
did propose it as a criterion of meaning."
 
This begs a question (Most things do, though). Since _science_ *means*; so  
even if Popper thought his criterion was for demarcating science vs. 
nonsense  (in his sense of 'nonsense') Ayer was not so off the mark.>
But Popper did _not_ (ever) propose his criterion as "demarcating science vs. 
nonsense", and so Ayer is way off the mark. And so it is way off to mark to 
suggest "Ayer was not so off the mark". In fact, it should amaze that Popper is 
still treated as if he were some 'meaning-philosopher' despite his multiple 
disavowals.

On one hand, Popper's mature philosophy understands that science originates 
from non-science and thus that non-science or metaphysics is not only 'not 
nonsense' but makes a most important contribution to science - it's the 
feeder-system for what become theories formulated so that they are testable, 
and it also sets frameworks which guide and influence what kinds of explanation 
we seek in testable terms. [Hence we can take Newton, Einstein and Darwin and, 
science aside, draw out a metaphysics of the world from their work].

Otoh, Popper's view is that decrying as nonsense what we can understand [e.g. 
"God is merciful"] is paradoxical and unconvincing, that it leads to dogmas of 
sense and nonsense that impede proper understanding of the merits of the 
theories expressed, and that just as almost anything with sense can be treated 
as nonsense (if we adopt a stringent enough criterion of sense) so almost any 
nonsense can be given some sense if we are so inclined (as some modern poetry 
proves). 

In terms of people like Ayer, and the Vienna Circle, Popper saw very clearly 
that there cannot be an 'empirical criterion of sense' that does not run into 
the problem that no such criterion can be derived from empiricism, and so the 
criterion must always be nonsense according to its own strictures [nor did 
Popper accept the Tractarian view that this 'nonsense according to its own 
strictures' is acceptable]. This is one of the fundamental reasons why his own 
empiricist criterion was never remotely offered as a criterion of sense.
It seems to me obvious that Popper's views are much better than the rival views 
above, and that those rival views - that might lumped together as versions of 
"logical positivism" - ought to have collapsed in credibility under the weight 
of Popper's critique. Yet the truth is that while "Logical Positivism" did 
collapse partly for the reasons given against it by Popper, it also collapsed 
because its 'language-based' philosophy of sense was replaced by later 
philosophies of sense that were less stringent and less science-based - but 
much of these later philosophies remain trapped within a framework of largely 
futile 'meaning-analysis' from Popper's pov.  

DL
  

 In a message dated 1/22/2016 3:33:32 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,  
donalmcevoyuk@xxxxxxxxxxx writes:
"It is true that some critics of Popper,  like Ayer, took Popper as 
proposing his 'demarcation criterion' as a criterion  of meaning when Popper 
never 
did propose it as a criterion of meaning."
 
This begs a question (Most things do, though). Since _science_ *means*; so  
even if Popper thought his criterion was for demarcating science vs. 
nonsense  (in his sense of 'nonsense') Ayer was not so off the mark.
 
McEvoy goes on:
 
"[O]ne source of this misinterpretation was that they offered their own  
verifiability-criterion as a criterion of meaning and took any rival criterion 
 as also being a criterion of meaning. If the falsifiability-criterion were 
a  criterion of meaning then it would, according to itself, be meaningless 
(because  unfalsifiable) - but happily Popper's actual views never suffered 
from this  grave and obvious defect, though the verifiability-criterion did 
(because  meaningless according to its own strictures)."
 
Well, Bartley III poses a related question: 
 
i. everything is controversial including this (i.e. (i)).
 
In other words.
 
ii. Everything is falsifiable.
 
Including (ii).
 
Ayer is a different beast, admittedly.
 
McEvoy:
 
 "Ayer led this false charge against Popper in the English-speaking  world. 
But Popper's own critique of the verifiability-criterion predated his  
awareness of Ayer and was based on (1) Popper's acquaintance with the views of  
the Vienna Circle [to which he was dubbed the 'official opposition'] (2)  
Popper's own failed but strenuous attempts to make a verifiability-criterion  
work (not something evident from Popper's published writings but from the  
reconstruction, of how Popper arrived at his published views, in Hacohen's  
first-rate biography)."
 
Thanks.

I never, with Geary, knew why they called it a circle --  Geary told me, "I 
was in Vienna, and they sat around a table, which was not even  round! 
Where is King Arthur, the once and future king, when one needs  him?".
 
But McEvoy is right. Ayer and Quine were at that table (the "Vienna  
Circle"). Ayer, prompted by Ryle. Quine prompted by some Harvardite, if not  
Emerson.
 
McEvoy:
 
"To think Popper's _LdF_ was intended as a 'refudiation' of Ayer is like  
thinking FDR proposed the New Deal to 'refudiate' Donald Trump."
 
This reminds me of a song by Judy Garland (also recorded by Flanagan and  
Allen -- I prefer their version):
 
"It's a big holiday in town". A new baby was born. His name: "F. D.  R."
 
In terms of "The End of History", it may well be argued that it is merely a 
 contingent matter (since there are no laws of history) that FDR did NOT 
propose  the New Deal to 'refudiate' Donal Trump. I drop the 'd' in Trump's 
first name.  Geary drops the 'p', and calls him "Trum".
 
Such are accents.
 
Incidentally, Clinton says that Palin endorsing Donal Trum can only  
'redudiate' him!
 
McEvoy concludes:
 
"[W]hat Popper was doing was making a normative proposal based on very  
simple (but profound) logical considerations. The value of this proposal lies  
largely in how it clarifies, in logical terms, what makes science valuable 
(i.e.  its highly testable character). In this way, the normative proposal 
throws much  light on what should be described as valuable science - but it is 
a proposal  that remains fundamentally normative because it cannot be 
derived from any facts  about science (though it pertains to and illuminates 
such 
facts) nor  derived/deduced from logic (though it amounts to a proposal as 
to how to apply  logical considerations to the evaluation of science)."
 
Mmm. Thanks. I wonder if that normativity David Home (of "Hume, Sweet Hume" 
 fame) would see as some sort of 'essence'. Essences are like 'ideals', as 
per  Kant's jargon.

So Popper is not saying what science IS, but what science SHOULD  be.
 
Similarly Kant. He thought that what Newton was doing is what ALL  
scientists SHOULD do.
 
Oddly, Popper ALSO focused on Newton; because he thought that since  
Einstein REFUDIATED Newton, Newton's model became a 'conjecture' and it is this 
 
"highly testable character" of Newton's theory ("an apple never falls down in 
 the open universe," as Einstein said) that makes Newton's theory 
'scientific'. 

O. T. O. H., usually the left one, Einstein's theory is hardly  refudiable.
 
Cheers,
 
Speranza
 
 
 
------------------------------------------------------------------
To change your Lit-Ideas settings (subscribe/unsub, vacation on/off,
digest on/off), visit www.andreas.com/faq-lit-ideas.html


  

Other related posts: