[lit-ideas] Re: The Griceian Given

  • From: "" <dmarc-noreply@xxxxxxxxxxxxx> (Redacted sender "Jlsperanza" for DMARC)
  • To: lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
  • Date: Tue, 5 Apr 2016 08:02:19 -0400

Thanks to McEvoy for his reply. We were considering the 'given',  
simpliciter, and not just as in 'datum', in sense datum, and whether epistemic  
justification can be conceptually analysed in terms of  "sufficient"  
comprehensiveness and coherence?

Sextus Empiricus, in "Against the  Mathematicians" (Loeb Classical Library) 
invokes similes that illuminate our  issue, such as the following: 

Sextus writes:
 
"Let us imagine that some people are looking for gold in a dark room  full 
of treasures."
 
"None of them will be PERSUADED that he has hit upon the gold  even IF he 
has in fact hit upon it."
 
"In the same way, the crowd of PHILOSOPHERS has  come into the  world, as 
into a vast house, in search of TRUTH."
 
"But it is reasonable that the man [PHILOSOPHER] who GRASPS  the TRUTH 
should doubt whether he has been  successful." 

In a message dated 4/5/2016 1:55:24 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time,  
dmarc-noreply@xxxxxxxxxxxxx comments on Sextus's analogy:
 
man        philosopher
------- =   ----------------------
gold             truth

"This is an excellent formulation which crucially separates out the  issue 
of being correct from the issue of being justified."
 
It _is_ a rather good analogy, but I take it more as an exploration of what 
 being a sceptic means.
 
McEvoy:
 
"Most traditional approaches to "knowledge" are justificationist [e.g. JTB  
theory], and regard the issues of being correct and being justified as  
inextricably linked. Popper's pov on "knowledge" is non- or  
anti-justificationist: it does not see the issues as inextricably linked  
(because we can be 
correct without being justified), and further argues that we  cannot have 
justification in the traditional sense - and also that we do not  need it. The 
crux is this:- human W3 "knowledge" (of which science is perhaps  the best 
example) works via a critical approach focused on being "correct" (or  
approximately so) and not at being "justified", and correctness is sought  
through 
rigorous 'trial-and-error(-elimination)' and not by seeking infallible  
grounds that justify knowledge."
 
While this is an excellent elaboration, in terms of the 'letter', I see  
Sextus's goal as being not as ambitious. A man in a dark room will never know 
if  he has hit gold (because gold is perceived through the sense datum of, 
say,  'colour' -- also that it dissolves in aqua regia, etc. Analogously, a  
philosopher (or a man? Sextus is unclear here, because when he starts his  
analogy he has two sentences: the first concerns the philosophers in a vast  
house; the second a man) will be reasonably doubtful as to whether he has  
grasped 'the truth'.
 
I must say that as a nominalist, I find Sextus's wording too abstract. He  
should have provided one single example of a true proposition. Cfr.  
Aristotle:
 
i. There will be a naval battle tomorrow.
 
(neither true nor false, for Aristotle).
 
ii. Socrates is a man.
 
etc.
 
iii. Socrates is a man or Socrates is not a man.
 
iv. Socrates is Socrates.
 
and so on.
 
So, once we are given this or that proposition whose truth-value to  
consider, the degree of reasonable doubt seems to vary.
 
McEvoy:

"The search for infallible grounds within 'experience' is not only  doomed 
but leads to philosophers offering as likely candidates some thin-sliced  
aspect of sense-experience [e.g. "raw feels"] that by themselves would offer  
barren ground on which to base far-reaching conjectures. Our far-reaching  
conjectures are not grounded in sense experience but may far transcend it:  
within science, 'experience' [in the form of 'observation'] is used to check  
these conjectures."
 
Not so much in mathematics, if a science it is, with
 
iv. Socrates is Socrates.
 
or
 
iii. Socrates is a man or Socrates is not a man.
 
Intuitionists (even beyond mathematics) doubt this, but they are a  
*special* _crowd_ what Sextus never knew!
 
McEvoy:
 
"The thought of Sextus has a precursor in Xenophanes. Fragments quoted by  
Popper provide an earlier formulation of what is a linchpin of the  
non-justificationist approach: Xenophanes points out that as for truth no human 
 has 
known it (in a justified sense), and even if we were to utter a truth  
(correctly) we would never know it (in a justified sense). In Xenophanes'  
version that is because justification (in this infallible sense) is knowledge  
only given to the "gods""
 
Good. 
 
McEvoy: 

"... whereas Popper's is a neo-Kantian version where the  lack of human 
"god-like" knowledge is explained by human limitations - but the  similarity is 
immense. Though Xenophanes' version might be given an anti-realist  and 
sceptical interpretation (doubting 'ultimate truth' and viewing human ideas  as 
only conventions relative to culture), Popper's reading emphasises how  
Xenophanes thinks we can combine non-justificationism with realism and  
non-scepticism - using the idea we can increasingly approximate to the  truth."
 
And one wonders what Xenophanes's M-intention was! ("M-intention" is just a 
 Griceianism for what Xenophanes intended to mean). 
 
McEvoy:

"This is not meant as a detour from sense-data. Its  relevance is that 
sense-data approaches are largely versions of justificationism  where 
justification bottoms out in infallible aspects of 'experience'  ['experience' 
that 
cannot be wrong]."
 
The keyword being INCORRIGIBILITY. Strictly: cannot be corrected. 
 
McEvoy:
 
"It is not surprising these approaches nearly always turn into a form of  
idealism [even Russell's "neutral monism" being a form of 
idealism-in-disguise  as its "elements" are not really "neutral" but 
experiential]:- because 
they  cannot provide any infallible link between 'experience' and what it 
pertains to  in an external world, and so become trapped in taking the 
foundations of  "knowledge" to be subjective experience. For Popper this is a 
trap of 
the  justificationist's own making and a preposterous one from a realist 
pov:  'experience' is never its own end-point but has its (evolutionary) point 
in  adapting us to an external world."
 
Well, as with Grice saying that it's apples, not sense data of apples, that 
 nurture us.
 
But we may need to explore under what conceptual analysis of 'true'  
Xenophanes and Sextus are working. They seem to be supposing a mere  
'correspondence' theory of true. Recall that for Ramsey, '... is true' is  
redundant: "It 
is true that it is raining" and "It is raining" being  equivalent, in that 
the prefix "It is true that...' is, as Grice and Albritton  would have it, 
'otiose'. For Grice, following Strawson here, "It is true  that..." merely 
conversationally implicates that your interlocutor has put  forward that 
proposition and you are endorsing your co-conversationalist view:  the 'ditto' 
theory of truth.
 
McEvoy:
 
"The way this adaptive knowledge [that we call 'experience'] works is not  
by having a foundation of infallibility"
 
or incorrigibility. The other keyword usually going in pair with this is  
"privileged access" --
 
McEvoy:
 
"... but by having a complex hierarchical structure where errors are  
eliminated and controlled for: in this approach, sense data as traditionally  
conceived play no role."
 
This presupposes that 'aletheia' (that Xenophanes and Sextus are talking  
about) relates to 'empirical' knowledge (which I doubt) and that they are  
presupposing a correspondence theory of truth. It is true that Grice, while  
allowing that Strawson is right in advocating for a 'ditto' theory of truth 
alla  Ramsey, what truth amounts to in fact is what he calls 'factual  
satisfactoriness' (In Aspects of reason, he changes his mind in that he wants 
to  
apply the crucial concept of 'satisfactoriness' that Tarski uses in his 
analysis  of 'true' to other modalities -- and thus he comes up with 'alethic  
satisfactoriness', or /--satisfactoriness, where /- is the Frege stroke, and  
practical satisfatoriness, or !-satisfactoriness. He even explores some  
implicatures of the latter:
 
v. Touch the beast and it will bite you.
 
Grice is concerned with the satisfactoriness of this. The first conjunct  
seems to be imperative:
 
vi. Touch the beast!
 
not something we usually would call 'true' (or 'false' for that matter). He 
 concludes that while imperative in form, this first conjunct, along with 
the  second conjunct, may just involve althetic satisfactoriness ("If you 
touch the  beast, it will bite you," or "If you touch the beast ) It will bite 
you", where  ")" is the horseshoe operator.
 
For the record, Xenophanes's wording (B34):
 
"…and of course the clear and certain truth no man has seen
nor will  there be anyone who knows about the gods and what I say about all 
things.
For  even if, in the best case, one happened to speak just of what has been 
brought  to pass,
still he himself would not know. But opinion is allotted to  all."
 
J. L. Austin was so fascinated by this that when Urmson and Warnock decided 
 to reprint his (Austin's Philosophical Papers) they included an 
unpublication by  Austin which provides a diagramme of how 'opinion', 'truth', 
and 
'episteme' all  fit in. I guess Austin loved, "opinion is allotted to all", and 
amused by the  plural -s in 'gods', Austin being officially C. of E., you 
know. 
 
And so on.
 


------------------------------------------------------------------
To change your Lit-Ideas settings (subscribe/unsub, vacation on/off,
digest on/off), visit www.andreas.com/faq-lit-ideas.html

Other related posts: