[lit-ideas] Re: Smullyaniana

  • From: Adriano Palma <Palma@xxxxxxxxxx>
  • To: "lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx" <lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 05:28:20 +0000

Raymond  Smullyan taught mostly at Indiana University, Bloomington. The silly 
remarks  of "how do you know" do not apply since I worked with him and for him.


-----Original Message-----
From: lit-ideas-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx [mailto:lit-ideas-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On 
Behalf Of dmarc-noreply@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Sent: 03 March 2015 04:09
To: lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: [lit-ideas] Smullyaniana

In a message dated 3/2/2015 7:47:21 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, 
omarkusto@xxxxxxxxx writes:
I give up on Thaoism then. 

Smullyan seems a good key to the thing, figuratively.
 
Smullyan is a Taoist philosopher, who believes, naturally, that Taoism neatly 
solves most or all traditional philosophical problems (including some 
pseudo-probolems, too) as well as integrating mathematics, logic, and 
philosophy  into what he calls "a cohesive whole."
 
Smullyan was not _born_ a Taoist. He _became_ one. 
 
He taught mainly at Lehman. 
 
In "The Tao Is Silent" Smullyan provides a beguiling and whimsical guide to  
the meaning and value of Eastern philosophy *to Westerners*.
 
The implicature seems to be Easteners don't need it.
 
'To me,' writes Smullyan, 'Taoism means a state of inner serenity combined with 
an intense aesthetic awareness.'
 
'It may mean something different to *you*,' he adds with a bit of sarcasm. 
 
'Neither serenity nor awareness alone is adequate: a purely  passive serenity 
is, to start, kind of dull; on the other hand, an  anxiety-ridden awareness 
will not appeal all.'
 
Asked about the topic of his book Smullyan replied, "Well, it's about life in 
general."
 
So I suppose the keyword should be Smullyan's LIFE. 
 
Smullyan sees the Taoist as 'one who is not so much in search of something he 
hasn't, but who is enjoying what he has.'
 
Smullyan, who taught at Lehmann, is witty and sophisticated -- yet deeply 
religious, and he discusses dogs (not just straw dogs), gardening, the art of  
napping, and computers who dream that they're human.
 
Smullyan thought of entitling the book, 'This Book Needs No Title' --  but then 
he found out he had already written one with that title. 
 
His PhD was under Alonzo Church, if that helps. 
 
Cheers,
 
Speranza
 
 
 




------------------------------------------------------------------
To change your Lit-Ideas settings (subscribe/unsub, vacation on/off, digest 
on/off), visit www.andreas.com/faq-lit-ideas.html

------------------------------------------------------------------
To change your Lit-Ideas settings (subscribe/unsub, vacation on/off,
digest on/off), visit www.andreas.com/faq-lit-ideas.html

Other related posts: