[lit-ideas] Re: Romanticism and Enlightenment

  • From: John McCreery <john.mccreery@xxxxxxxxx>
  • To: "lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx" <lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Tue, 19 Sep 2017 18:37:59 +0900

Thank you, Donal, for taking my brainstorm seriously. It may, indeed, be the 
case that only one of two possibilities can be realized. That does not, 
however, exclude the possibility of n>2 possibilities to begin with. Another 
important consideration is the stability of the context in which change occurs. 
It has long been observed, for example, that ecological systems in stable 
environments tend to become more efficient, with the number of species reduced 
and the system approaching an equilibrium condition in which simple, linear 
relationships account pretty well for how the system behaves. The downside is 
that the system becomes less resilient and more exposed to total destruction 
when the environment suddenly changes. A tropical island, for example, may be a 
nice place to retire — until a force 5 hurricane passes over it.

Weather forecasting and the current use of what are called spaghetti plots in 
describing the possible paths of hurricanes are a good illustration of these 
points.

Cheers,

John

On Sep 19, 2017 17:29 +0900, wrote:


s to possibilities and where it pertains to what can be "realized". It may 
sometimes be that only one of two possibilities can be "realized", and so 
there is a "binary opposition" between the realisation of those possibilities 
(though both may exist as possibilities). Where there is not enough 'logical 
space' for different possibilities to be "realized", those 'possibilities' 
may be pitted against each other in terms of their being "realized" - and in 
the real world this is often the case. I don't quite see how John's 
concluding remarks help - either in resolving issues of "binary opposition" 
or dissolving them.

D
L

Other related posts: