[lit-ideas] Re: Putnamiana

  • From: Donal McEvoy <donalmcevoyuk@xxxxxxxxxxx>
  • To: "lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx" <lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Thu, 24 Mar 2016 07:00:57 +0000 (UTC)

Never mind. "Ladenness" can be a trick> 

Or tricky. JLS is also right that there can various theories of 
'theory-ladenness'.
There can also be various theories as to how observation is theory-laden.
Now ask: does the theory-ladenness of observation impede observation as a test 
of a theory?
It depends. It may do where the observation is so laden with the theory to be 
tested that it is not any independent check on that theory. 

At the risk of offending any witches on the list, and other risks, let's take 
the example of the 'witches ducking stool' and conceive the stool as producing 
an observation where the witch is submerged for minutes. In this version, the 
theory is 'if the alleged witch drowns that proves she was a witch (so evil God 
didn't save her) and if she doesn't drown that proves she is a witch (so evil 
the devil saved her)'. 

It is clear this cannot be a scientific test because both outcomes - drowning 
or not drowning - are with consistent with the theory, and so the ducking stool 
is not a scientific test of the  theory because there are no test outcomes that 
can falsify the theory (leaving aside possibilities like the witch growing 
wings and flying off like an angel etc).
What about 'observation'? It depends what level and kind of observation we have 
in mind. If we say we observed the witch to be a witch because she either 
drowned or didn't drown, it is clear this level or kind of 'observation' is so 
laden (with the theory it supposedly confirms) that it is not an observation 
that is independent of the theory sufficient that it provides any rational 
check on its truth.
But an observation can be highly theory-laden and operate as a check on 
theories provided it is sufficiently independent of the theories it is 
checking: so theory-ladenness does not mean an observation cannot check 
theories, though it may do where the observation consequently lacks 
independence from the theory it checks.
Something like that.
DL


 

    On Wednesday, 23 March 2016, 20:57, "dmarc-noreply@xxxxxxxxxxxxx" 
<dmarc-noreply@xxxxxxxxxxxxx> wrote:
 

 In a message dated 3/23/2016 4:25:08 P.M.  Eastern Daylight Time, 
donalmcevoyuk@xxxxxxxxxxx writes:
I came to  'theory-ladenness' laden with the wrong theory.  

Never mind. "Ladenness" can be a trick, and you've now corrected your wrong 
 theory. As we see from the earlier post, 'theory-laden' has been applied  
variously, so indeed there is a theory behind theory-ladenness and as long 
as  you've come to it, your theory could not be THAT wrong.
 
Why do I say 'theory-laden' has been applied as 'adjectivising' different  
stuff? Well, I should consult with M. Aragona, but...
 
In 1886, The Medical & Surgical Reporter" applies "theory-laden" to  'tome':
 
i. It is in strong and favourable contrast to the ponderous, theory-laden  
tomes of Ziemmsen's Cyclopœdia.
 
Surely we can reduce that to some reference to 'theory-laden' as applied to 
 observation, but I would not know if Ziemmsen would agree!
 
Hanson himself does not apply 'theory-laden' to 'observation'.
 
In 1958, N. R. Hanson in "Patterns of Discovery" he writes:
 
ii. "There is a sense [or way as I'd prefer -- Speranza] in which seeing is 
 a 'theory-laden' undertaking. Observation of x is shaped by prior 
knowledge  of x."
 
There are two sentences here:
 
iia. There is a [way] in which seeing [can be seen] as a 'theory-laden'  
undertaking.
iib. Observation of x is shaped by prior knowledge of x.
 
In any case, he applies it to 'undertaking', and the subject of his claim  
is just ONE verb, 'seeing' (one of Grice's favourite verbs, as in "Macbeth 
saw  Banquo" -- "to think that there is a disimplicature here, since Banquo 
wasn't  there to be seen is a commonplace of Shakespearian scholars.")
 
In 2000, Economy & Philosophy,  vol. 16 has 'theory-laden' applied  to 
'observation reports', not 'observation' simpliciter and per se. A world of  
difference. 
 
iii. It is nowadays fashionable to claim that observation reports in  
science are no less 'theory-laden' than high level explanations.
 
Note that iritatingly, "Economy and Philosophy" are still being _scared_ as 
 Hanson (understandably) was back in the day -- having never read, most 
likely,  Ziemmsen's Cyclopœdia.
 
In 2008, M. Glantz & J. Mun in, "The Banker's Handbook on  Credit Risk", 
make fun of 'theory-laden' as applied, if not to 'tomes', as  the "Medical and 
Surgical Report" had done, to plain books (excluding their own  handbook):
 
iv. There are a plethora of mathematical modeling and theory-laden  books  
without any real hands-on applicability."
 
No wonder Putnam was fascinated by the concept!
 
Cheers,

Speranza
 
 
 
------------------------------------------------------------------
To change your Lit-Ideas settings (subscribe/unsub, vacation on/off,
digest on/off), visit www.andreas.com/faq-lit-ideas.html

  

Other related posts: