[lit-ideas] Re: Popper and Grice on the conceptual analysis of 'science'

  • From: "Donal McEvoy" <dmarc-noreply@xxxxxxxxxxxxx> (Redacted sender "donalmcevoyuk" for DMARC)
  • To: "lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx" <lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Tue, 12 Apr 2016 19:57:35 +0000 (UTC)

I fail to understand 'hand-and-hand'.>
Come now. Did it not occur to you that it was a rushed attempt at 
'hand-in-hand', given the context?
Though, for all you know, it was because these two terms are sound-a-likes and 
my voice decoder mistook my Irish accent when I first spoke the phrase from my 
hospital bed. 

DL
 

    On Tuesday, 12 April 2016, 18:06, "dmarc-noreply@xxxxxxxxxxxxx" 
<dmarc-noreply@xxxxxxxxxxxxx> wrote:
 

 Apparently, it all goes back to when Popper's father tried to define him  
(Popper's son, that is, our Popper) 'science'. "You see, son, science is..."  

In a message dated 4/12/2016 12:02:37 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time, McEvoy  
writes:
"Bingo. It goes back to late childhood/early adolescence. As Popper  
relates in "Unended Quest", he then got into various interesting conversations  
with adults on a range of topics but couldn't see any substance to the 
argument  when based on 'definitions'. He never recovered."

On the other hand,  there was this British author who collected definitions 
of "life" ("Life is a  cabaret", "Life is _just_ a bowl of cherries"). Cfr. 
the profuse definitions of  happiness ("Happiness is a warm gun.")

McEvoy:

"Amazing as it may  seem, he was also right - and his attitude only 
hardened as he got older and  heard more and more philosophers and other 
academics 
waste everybody's time with  definitional piffle."

Perhaps he failed to disimplicate. I'm sure that  (while Popper does not 
explicitly explicate this), his father's intention was  not ill-meant. He was 
trying to define 'science' for him. "There's science in  this, son." 
""Science?" -- Popper junior had never heard that word before --  recall we're 
in 
Vienna and it's a longer thing: wissenschaft. "Yes, son,  'wissenschaft'. A 
formation ending in -schaft, and cognate with 'wissen', as  when you say, "I 
know"". "I know," Popper junior responded. 

What Popper  junior failed to see was that his father was _challenging_ 
him, inviting the  implicature: "unless you have a better definition, of 
course."

But then  Carroll was never popular in Vienna. For Humpty Dumpty, glory is 
defined as a  knock-down argument. Alice is happy with this. When he later 
says,  "Impenetrability", Alice smells a rat (figuratively). "And how do you 
define  that?" "I define 'impenetrability' as 'let's change the topic,  
darling.'"

McEvoy:

"Some of [Popper's] objections to definitional  arguments are simple e.g. a 
definition must always either (a) use undefined  terms (whose definition in 
turn must create an infinite regress) or (b) the  infinite regress is 
avoided by circularity (but the circle cannot therefore  explain the meaning). 
This means a definition can solve nothing but only give  the illusion it is a 
solution - for a circular solution, or one that only shifts  the problem, 
cannot be a satisfactory or genuine solution."

This does NOT  seem to be the implicature behind Popper senior: 
'wissenschaft' has to do with  'wissen', to know. So we REDUCE 'science' to the 
simpler 
concept of 'wissen',  and, you know, it's easier that way. 'Wissen' is then 
reduced to a justified  true belief. We have to wait for Gettier to 
challenge THAT  definition.

McEvoy:

"Popper also saw clearly that while  philosophers were trapped in 
definitional talk and often never got beyond  definitional preliminaries, the 
sciences had progressed by avoiding getting  bogged down in definitions - as 
had 
all areas of knowledge that had made  important progress. In the light of his 
later philosophy of W3, it is clear that  Popper would argue 
language-acquisition is W3-dependent and not  definition-dependent: the 
illusion that we 
have clarified things by definition  is really because we have instead 
clarified the relevant sense in W3 terms, and  grasp of W3 'meaning' is not via 
definitions rather definitions make sense to us  because we grasp relevant W3 
'meanings'."
 
Well, this is a convoluted point, and I'm not sure Cicero would agree.  
Rhetoricians of old spent volumes defining 'definitions', but VERY FEW gave a  
hoot ('hootus,' Cicero calls it) to "W3". But I take McEvoy's point. 
 
McEvoy's talk of illusion reminds me of Hacker. Hacker (who sat on the same 
 chair Grice did, up in that small office at St. John's) used to say he had 
two  favourite words:

One was illusion.
 
The other was insight. 
 
"the illusion we have clarified things by definition"
 
is a good one. It reminds me of Lewis, who said,
 
"clarity is not enough" -- subtitled: essays in the criticism of linguistic 
 philosophy.
 
A linguistic philosopher does more than 'define', under an illusion or not. 
 He sets the definition in terms of 'analysans' and 'analysandum', which do 
not  necessarily involve a 'vicious circle'. The idea of 'infinite regress' 
can be  easily refudiated by that of self-reference. Thus, Grice's 
conceptual analytic  definition of meaning relies on self-reference:
 
U means that p by uttering x iff 
a. U intends addressee A to think that U believes/desires p
b. U intends (a) to proceed via A's recognition of (b)
c. U intends that (a)-(c) should be all in the open: no sneaky intentions  
allowed.
 
"If I'm very secretive about my trying to convey that p, I cannot be  
claimed to have MEANT that p." (cfr. Holdcroft, "Forms of indirect  
communication").
 
McEvoy:
 
"Popper is right about that too, as the following story illustrates.  
Consider the following question of 'meaning': Rudy last week was walking back  
with me to the car, from visiting a theme park, when we came upon a set of 
signs  which included a sign in the following format: 'red circle with a line 
across'  (which means what is symbolised within the cirlce is not allowed) 
and within the  circle a black stick-person figure (representing an adult) and 
a smaller black  stick-person figure (representing a child) with the 
figures' arms overlapping at  the point where their hands would be (indicating 
they were hand-in-hand). Rudy  had never seen such a sign before (and I don't 
recall seeing one either) but  correctly deduced the sign prohibited 
something in relation to adult and child -  but he did not deduce that the sign 
was 
saying 'No walking of adults and  children on this pathway'. Instead he 
asked me, who was holding his hand: "Are  we not allowed to hold hands?" 
Definitions played no more role in clarifying the  actual meaning of that sign 
than 
they play in language-acquisition  generally."
 
This reminds me of Grice who once sat on the tub for hours devising what he 
 called the new Highway Code. He realised "that it probably will have no 
meaning  other than to me, but who cares. I still _mean_ by it."
 
McEvoy goes on to provide the moral of his charming story:
 
"Rudy quickly understood its actual meaning because he quickly grasped the  
problem-situation (that the pathway was dangerous because of oncoming 
vehicles)  and could see the meaning as a solution to the problem-situation, 
and 
because  like most children he can use symbolic representation as a 
(flexible) means to  decode relevant W3 content. He didn't make any pointless 
definitional criticisms  of the sign - for example, that it should be showing 
adult and child both  hand-and-hand and not hand-in-hand, as both possibilities 
would be dangerous.  Only the most foolish lawyer (or philosopher) would try 
to argue the sign was  flawed for this 'definitional' reason or that we 
needed this definitional  amplification to get its meaning."
 
I fail to understand 'hand-and-hand'.
 
But Grice gave a lecture on Peirce, so I should know.
 
This for Peirce is a 'sign' (not a symbol, or an index).
 
The fact that red is used is obvious. RED means Prohibition/Danger,  
Dangerous behaviour. Round shape; black pictogram on white background; red  
edging 
and diagonal line; red part to be at least 35% of the area of the sign. 
 
I'm sure there is a strict definition of what the sign means. For Peirce  
'meaning' is a triadic relation. There is always an interpretant, in this 
case,  Rudy. 
 
Grice once used 'interpretant', in his publications, without quoting  
Peirce. This gave a Peirce scholar the clue that Grice had been reading Peirce. 
 
And indeed he had, and given lectures on him which are now deposited at the  
Bancroft Library (Grice criticises Peirce). 
 
There are definitions and definitions.
 
The above sign may be said to be 'ambiguous' in that two 'definitions' (at  
least) are possible:
 
(a) cfr. Rudy -- "Are we not allowed to hold hands?" -- the sign means that 
 an adult and a child should not hold hand.
(b) No walking of adults and children on this pathway.
 
It may be implicated that 
 
(c) No walking of children on this pathway.
 
is also involved, as an entailment of (b) -- but not
 
(d) No walking of adults on this pathway.
 
This talk of 'pathway', etc., requires explicit definitions from the  
relevant Department, since very serious safety is involved. 
 
The fact that Rudy arrived at the right interpretation via a  
problem-solving approach is in part to be credited to the designer of the  
pictogram 
(Grice's "utterer"). This utterer was having in mind the idea of a  natural 
representation, iconic -- and 'icon' is a key term in Peirce's  semiotics. It 
would be odd that the sign should represent, say, an elephant next  to an 
uncrossed angel (which may mean "elephants allowed to walk here, but  not 
angels 
if they are too afraid to tread') but used to mean "no walking of  adults 
and children on this pathway'. The designer of the pictogram was  following 
the idea that a natural sign is a good thing, and that if he was paid  to 
design a non-natural (to use Grice's parlance) sign, this should not deter  him 
from relying on the natural-sign relation.
 
All this is so full of definitions, which are not necessarily circular,  
that one wonders about Grice's protreptic/exhibitive.
 
Grice coined this distinction to deal with signs like the one meaning "no  
walking of adults and children on this pathway."

"Under an exhibitive reading of the sign, the utterer's intention may  well 
be that the intended addressee comes to realise that it is the utterer's  
intention [not to allow an adult and a child to walk on this pathway -- due 
to  the potential danger caused by incoming vehicles]. But under a stronger  
protreptic reading, surely the utterer also intends that his intended 
addresee  will himself FORM the intention NOT [to walk on this pathway, due to 
the 
 potential danger caused by incoming vehicles]."
 
It may all be different with Popper and science.
 
He possibly relied on _implicit_ definitions. And he kept changing them.  
How else do you explain that, before lecturing at Darwin College (oops, I 
said,  'college', contra Nancy Mitford -- but lecturing at Darwin sounds rude), 
he  thought that evolution theory was not 'scientific', and _minutes_ 
before giving  that lecture (so to say) he came to 'define' (implicitly, of 
course) 'science'  in such a way that evolution theory was okay?
 
Was it a letter he received from a prestigious evolutionary theorist who  
made Popper changed his mind about how to define 'science' via conceptual  
analysis? Or was just the weather?
 
Cheers,
 
Speranza
 
 
 
 
 
------------------------------------------------------------------
To change your Lit-Ideas settings (subscribe/unsub, vacation on/off,
digest on/off), visit www.andreas.com/faq-lit-ideas.html


  

Other related posts: