[lit-ideas] Popper And Grice On Personal Identity

  • From: "" <dmarc-noreply@xxxxxxxxxxxxx> (Redacted sender "jlsperanza" for DMARC)
  • To: lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
  • Date: Mon, 14 Aug 2017 20:30:35 -0400


Popper and Grice on Personal Identity

 

Grice, Popper, and Narcissus.

 

T. Fjeld notes: 

 

“Regarding the question of whether “the roots of modern depression [lies] in 
narcissism, the ‘overwrought, pathologically distorted self-reference’ that 
flourished in cultures that valorize personal achievement and consequently 
flatten out our relationships” there's several views on this. One is that we 
live in a 'culture of narcissism' (see this), which was a view that was quite 
topical a few decades ago. Another is that narcisissim is not so much specific 
to a single culture, as it is a consequence of the kinds of societies that are 
made by late modernity (this seems to be the view, roughly, of the author 
quoted by Helm). Then there's the debate of the way the ego is viewed in 
psycho-analysis, which is related not by essence but by contingency to the 
first question. The point here is that narcissism is a term from psychology, 
and should we not properly cosider whether psycho-analytic thinking and 
therapeutic approaches have had a hand on the wheel when our perception of our 
selves has become -- we can assume -- so hung up on 'overwrought, 
pathologically distorted self-reference' and 'personal achievement'? Well, the 
thing is that many historians of psycho-analysis holds that Freud should take 
some of the heat for the present situation: they claim that it was he who 
argued that the way to treat neurosis was to strengthen the ego, which, in 
effect, has caused a tremendous growth of self-help therapies to the forefront 
of our culture. Others argue that this is a strictly American 
(mis-)interpretation of Freud, which, as Helm seems to content, has been 
exacerbated by specific cultural traits (such as the idealisation of personal 
acheivement). Finally, there is the view -- ala Heidegger and his students -- 
that the ego is a misunderstanding of the self (itself, if one is allowed the 
pun). As Jacques Lacan would later have it: I am most myself when I am not 
myself. What an excentric!”

 

Mmm. What would Popper and Grice say? Let’s consider Grice first!

 

“Regarding the question of whether “the roots of modern depression [lies] in 
narcissism, the ‘overwrought, pathologically distorted self-reference’ that 
flourished in cultures that valorize personal achievement and consequently 
flatten out our relationships” there's several views on this.”

 

As on everything. I think McEvoy calls this ‘perspectivism,’ and one of his 
favourite acronyms, is “pov,” short not for the “poverty of historicism,” but 
for “point of view”. 

 

Fjeld:

 

“One is that we live in a 'culture of narcissism' (see this), which was a view 
that was quite topical a few decades ago.”

 

I wonder if Narcissus (or Descartes with his solipsism) would agree. The whole 
point of being a narcissistic seems to be that you deny the conceptual analysis 
of ‘culture’: cfr. “a culture of solipsism.”

 

Fjeld:

 

“Another is that narcisissim is not so much specific to a single culture, as it 
is a consequence of the kinds of societies that are made by late modernity 
(this seems to be the view, roughly, of the author quoted by Helm).”

 

A reviewer of the LRB, as Helm noted.

 

“Then there's the debate of the way the ego is viewed in psycho-analysis, which 
is related not by essence but by contingency to the first question. The point 
here is that narcissism is a term from psychology, and should we not properly 
consider whether psycho-analytic thinking and therapeutic approaches have had a 
hand on the wheel when our perception of our selves has become -- we can assume 
-- so hung up on 'overwrought, pathologically distorted self-reference' and 
'personal achievement'?”

 

I agree that narcissism is a ‘term of art’ of psychoanalysis, but this should 
not forbid the layman to use it. Afterwards, ‘falsification’ is a Popperian 
term of art, and non-Popperians use it. “Implicatura” was coined by Sidonius, 
and people other than Sidonius use it!

 

Fjeld:

“Well, the thing is that many historians of psycho-analysis holds that Freud 
should take some of the heat for the present situation: they claim that it was 
he who argued that the way to treat neurosis was to strengthen the ego, which, 
in effect, has caused a tremendous growth of self-help therapies to the 
forefront of our culture.’”

 

One good thing about Freud is that he was a classisist, and I admit I don’t 
dislike his –ism term of art, ‘narcissism’, qua term if not qua concept! 

 

Fjeld:

 

“Others argue that this is a strictly American (mis-)interpretation of Freud, 
which, as Helm seems to contend, has been exacerbated by specific cultural 
traits (such as the idealisation of personal acheivement).”

 

I collect American misinterpretations of things – my favourite is the American 
misinterpration of Grice. Since Grice became an American (in due time), the 
misinterpretation became true!

 

Fjeld:

 

“Finally, there is the view -- ala Heidegger and his students -- that the ego 
is a misunderstanding of the self (itself, if one is allowed the pun). As 
Jacques Lacan would later have it: I am most myself when I am not myself. What 
an excentric!””

 

Yes, Lacan was an eccentric, and I would agree that Heidegger may be right that 
‘ego’ is a techno-kryptic concept best replaced by ‘self’. Strictly, ‘ego’ 
translates as the “I”. In the Romance languages, you don’t need the ‘ego’, but 
you need the “self”. Thus, “canto,” I sing, lacks the “I”. “I sing to myself” 
is actually an example from Carmen, the opera, that a Griceian uses to confirm 
that Grice allows that Carmen can SING TO HERSELF, because she becomes her own 
addressee!

 

Apparently, Popper preferred ‘self’ to ‘ego’, while Grice, typically – being an 
ordinary language philosopher – preferred “I”, as in “I sing”. “Ego” is 
confusing – and Grice recognises in his “Personal identity” that part of that 
confusion is due to Broad (but then Grice perhaps was biased, because Broad is 
Cambridge, and Grice is Oxford). In a later unpublication, Grice refers to the 
“I” as a ‘logical construction’. In what way do:

 

i.                 I sing.

 

differs from 

 

ii.                Thou singest.

 

and

 

iii.              He sings.

 

The ‘self’ should apply to the three cases, but of course ‘ego’ is restricted 
to (i). Grice’s analysis of “I” is in terms of memory, alla Locke, and applies, 
of course, to his analysis of “thou” and “he”. I’m less sure about Popper’s 
‘self’.

 

Narcissism seems to involve what Russell would call the relation of ‘love’. Ego 
is narcissistic iff

 

iv.              LOVE (Ego, Ego)

 

where the healthy scenario is

 

v.                LOVE (Ego, Thou)

 

We can leave “He” alone. The Bible (since McEvoy likes to quote from it) 
teaches us that you should love thy neighbour as you love yourself. Is the 
Bible promoting narcissism? Lacan read Heidegger and he possibly knew.

 

Cheers,

 

Speranza

Other related posts: