[lit-ideas] Pecorous

  • From: adriano paolo shaul gershom palma <palmaadriano@xxxxxxxxx>
  • To: "lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx" <lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Mon, 6 Aug 2018 09:58:52 +0000

pecorous as in herd behaviour-like


it is general for flocks, herds etc.

it laso has a use as financial re-a-wards (pecuniary in english)



the name of the cheese is far later, from portuguese origins, I was taught



*pecus* n (*genitive* *pecoris
<https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/pecoris#Latin>*); *third
<https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Appendix:Latin_third_declension>*

   1. (zoology <https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/zoology>) A group
   <https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/group> of large
   <https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/large> domestic
   <https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/domestic> animals
   <https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/animal>: a herd
   <https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/herd> of cattle
   <https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/cattle>, horses
   <https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/horse>, or donkeys
   <https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/donkey>; such
   <https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/such> animals
   <https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/animal> in a collective
   <https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/collective> sense
   <https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/sense>: cattle
   <https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/cattle> and equines
   <https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/equine>. quotations ▼
   2. (zoology <https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/zoology>, figuratively
   <https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Appendix:Glossary#figurative>) Any other
   <https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/other> group
   <https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/group> of animals
   <https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/animal>, imagined
   <https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/imagine> as a herd
   <https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/herd> or flock
   <https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/flock>; such
   <https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/such> animals
   <https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/animal> collectively
   <https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/collective> exclusive
   <https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/exclusive> of humanity
   <https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/humanity>: beasts
   <https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/beast>. quotations ▼
   3. (derogatory <https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/derogatory>) A mindless
   <https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/mindless> group
   <https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/group> of people
   <https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/people>: "cattle
   <https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/cattle>", "sheep
   <https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/sheep>", rabble
   <https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/rabble>, the mob
   <https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/mob>.
   4. (zoology <https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/zoology>, Late Latin
   <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Late_Latin>) Any individual
   <https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/individual> animal
   <https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/animal>, conceived
   <https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/conceive> as a member
   <https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/member> or usual
   <https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/usual> member
   <https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/member> of a flock
   <https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/flock> or herd
   <https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/herd>.

Usage
In Latin, *pecora <https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/pecora#Latin>* may be
used for any domestic animal, especially larger herd animals, but the
stronger plow-drawing animals (*armenta
<https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/armenta#Latin>*) and cart-drawing
animals (*iumenta
<https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/iumenta#Latin>*) were often distinguished.
In Late Latin, the neuter form of *pecus* was generally used for all the
senses of feminine *pecus <https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/pecus#Latin-herd>*
palma,   apgs






On Sun, Aug 5, 2018 at 9:43 PM david ritchie <profdritchie@xxxxxxxxx> wrote:

Question for those of you who have more Latin than I do.  Pecorous is an
obsolete word meaning, “full of cattle.”  The OED says that the root is a
Latin one-pecor, cattle.  But just above that entry is pecorino, the cheese
(and former chicken).  And that entry says the term derives from Italian
and French, pecora…sheep.  Sheep being confused with goats is one thing,
but sheep in the same category as cows?  Is the reference perhaps to hooved
animals?

David Ritchie,
Portland,
Oregon------------------------------------------------------------------
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