[lit-ideas] Re: On underestimating America

  • From: John McCreery <john.mccreery@xxxxxxxxx>
  • To: lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
  • Date: Thu, 20 Feb 2020 09:35:36 +0900

Lawrence,

All of these are important considerations. My questions are directed against 
arguments that move directly from idea or emotion to outcomes, without 
considering material conditions. Thus, for example, I would want to know 
whether the Japanese pilots turned back because their aircraft lacked the range 
of those flown by their American enemy or simply searched in the wrong 
direction. The stories I’ve heard suggest that it was a close thing on the 
American side, since the American searchers were approaching the limit of their 
range when clouds broke and they spotted the Japanese fleet. If the cloud cover 
had held for a few more minutes, the battle might have had a different outcome.

Just saying.

John

Sent from my iPad

On Feb 20, 2020, at 9:27, Lawrence Helm <lawrencehelm@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx> wrote:


John,
 
Yes, that too.  Neither the Japanese nor the Americans had decent technology. 
 They had to send out search planes and hope for the best.  But many of the 
Japanese searchers didn’t do their best.  They turned back early, and didn’t 
search all the areas that they should.  That slackness seems in part 
attributable to the autocratic nature of the Japanese navy, i.e., “you don’t 
need to think.  We’ll do the thinking for you.  You just do as you’re told.”  
Thus when some searchers encountered matters outside “what they were told,” 
they took actions that were easiest, not necessarily those that would best 
support the mission.
 
Also, another indication of Yamamoto’s hubris, the Americans had broken the 
Japanese code, but Yamamoto didn’t believe that was possible.  He never took 
that possibility into consideration in support of any of his actions. 
 
The breaking of the Japanese code gave the Americans some idea of where the 
Japanese fleet was.  The Japanese on the other hand arrived at Midway 
assuming that the American fleet had yet to arrive.  If you were a pilot sent 
up to search for the American fleet, you might think it a waste of time if it 
was common knowledge that the American fleet hadn’t arrived yet.  Whereas the 
American searcher knew the Japanese fleet was there . . . some place.
 
Lawrence
 
From: lit-ideas-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx [mailto:lit-ideas-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] ;
On Behalf Of John McCreery
Sent: Wednesday, February 19, 2020 3:58 PM
To: lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: [lit-ideas] Re: On underestimating America
 
What my daughter was taught at Annapolis is that Nimitz got lucky. Neither 
fleet knew where the other was. Planes from the US fleet discovered 
Yamamoto’s carriers before the Japanese discovered the US carriers. As a 
result, most of Japanese air power was wiped out. Then it was a turkey shoot.
 
WARNING: This is my memory speaking. No sources to cite. (That said, it 
reminds me of that old military maxim about the fog of war and how strategy 
rarely survives the start of battle.)
 
John

Sent from my iPad


On Feb 20, 2020, at 0:22, david ritchie <profdritchie@xxxxxxxxx> wrote:




On Feb 19, 2020, at 6:49 AM, Lawrence Helm <lawrencehelm@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx> 
wrote:
 
 



On Feb 18, 2020, at 12:43 PM, Lawrence Helm <lawrencehelm@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx> 
wrote:
 
I’m about 10% through Weinberg’s A World At Arms.  He discusses, as everyone 
seems to, how leaders in Germany and Japan underestimated the military 
potential of America.
 
David wrote:
Keegan is clear that Yamamoto, having spent time in the U.S. did not 
underestimate that potential at all.  I’ve now finished “The Price of 
Admiralty,” which title apparently comes from Kipling, “the price of 
admiralty [domination of the seas] is blood.”
 
Lawrence responded:
 
Yes, I had read that same thing, but that statement seems to apply to 
America’s industrial capability.  In a long war American industrial 
capability would overwhelm that of the Japanese.  But Yamamoto had a low 
opinion of American’s actual fighting capabilities. Yamamoto made some bad, 
even fatal, decisions in that regard.  I read a couple of books recently on 
Midway that place the Japanese failure in that battle directly on Yamamoto’s 
head.  He thought the Americans unwilling to fight and that they needed to be 
tricked in order to do so.  He chose what he considered a good place from 
which to pounce.  The Americans utterly surprised him by being there before 
him, in much better position, very willing to fight, and able to do a much 
better job of it than the Japanese.  Yamamoto and the rest of the Japanese 
admiralty should have committed suicide after that battle, but instead lied 
about what happened at Midway, saying it was a great victory for them, in 
order to keep Japanese fighting spirits as high as possible.   
 
Keegan’s version  of Midway has a different emphasis.  He thinks it’s caused 
in part by the Doolittle raid.  You might enjoy that part of his book, “The 
Price of Admiralty.”  I started “A World At Arms” last night.  Not very 
engaging and his opening statments about Japan seem to discount their 
economic predicament.  With limited access to oil, they were in a bind.  I 
imagine he returns to the issue later.
 
David Ritchie,
Portland, Oregon
 

Other related posts: