[lit-ideas] Re: Motivated Irrationality

  • From: Donal McEvoy <donalmcevoyuk@xxxxxxxxxxx>
  • To: "lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx" <lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Fri, 26 Feb 2016 10:33:14 +0000 (UTC)

McEvoy:

"here logic simply defeats him. There is no  alternative."
 
Well, I don't think Susan Haack would agree. She wrote "Deviant logics," as 
 did Quine.>
Please spell out the alternative valid logic. We could all do with a laugh.
DL
 

    On Thursday, 25 February 2016, 20:26, "dmarc-noreply@xxxxxxxxxxxxx" 
<dmarc-noreply@xxxxxxxxxxxxx> wrote:
 

 When Pears speaks of 'motivated' irrationality, he is obviously being  
'Griceian', for a motive is not a reason, not even a wrong one (McEvoy was  
expanding on wrong reasons of late). 
 
In a message dated 2/25/2016 2:46:08 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,  
donalmcevoyuk@xxxxxxxxxxx writes [I'm paraphrasing slightly]: "I think we can  
boil 
it down to something more straightforward: is there a valid alternative to  
the "logic" which underpins "what is correct" and "what is incorrect 
according  to Wason's selection task? The answer is no. I.e. there is no valid 
alternative  to what is correct and what is incorrect according to Wason's 
selection  task, properly framed. On this an anecdote: Wason's selection task 
was 
given to  the teachers at a secondary school as part of a student project. 
Those in maths  and computing science were the only ones to briskly get 
Wason's selection  task right. They then stood back in quiet amusement as 
teachers in other  departments refused to accept their answers were incorrect 
and 
instead engaged  in elaborate (and doomed) attempts to give a different 
interpretative sense  to Wason's selection task according to which their 
answers 
would be  correct. The language teachers were the worst for contrived 
attempts to 'evade  falsification' in this way."
 
I hope that secondary school wasn't CLIFTON, that Grice attended! (Grice  
attended 'elementary school' at his own house since his mother, Mabel  
Fenton, was a teacher, and they couldn't afford -- Grice's father being a 
failed  
businesman -- but when the time came for Grice to attend a proper school, 
the  Grices -- Grice's parents that is, made a bit of an effort and sent him 
to  Clifton. He stayed there until he won his scholarship to Corpus Christi 
--  arriving at the Dreaming Spires as a 'Midlands scholarship boy'. 
 
McEvoy goes on: "It is not known whether any of the language teachers were  
Griceians."
 
Well, as long as the school wasn't Clifton, I shouldn't care. But McEvoy is 
 right in taking Griceians as obsessed with language. In fact, pre-Griceian 
 Oxonian philosophers were also obsessed with lingo, and it is said that 
Lewis  Carroll's "Humpty Dumpty" is a parody on the Oxonian philosopher, as he 
knew him  ("I'm the master of my words").
 
McEvoy:
 
"That is also to say: there is no valid alterative. And [Speranza's]  talk 
of alternatives is doomed to failure and irrelevance - for logical reasons.  
For the whole notion of validity here is logical validity."
 
On which Strawson spent PAGES in his "Introduction to Logical Theory". He  
found it the most difficult of the concepts he had set to analyse! (but 
promptly  acknowledges "Mr. H. P. Grice" as he "from whom he never ceased to 
learn  logic"). 
 
McEvoy:

"So while [Speranza] may never admit defeat (in the  search for a Gricean 
alternative to Popper),"
 
-- or Wason, since I like to rob Peter [Cathcart Wason] to pay [Herbert]  
Paul [Grice] (The idiom, 'to rob Peter to pay Paul originates from the days 
when  St. Paul's cathedral was built -- 'awful', the king said, meaning or 
implicating  'awesome' -- with funds collected at Westminster, i.e. St. 
Peter's. 
 
McEvoy:

"here logic simply defeats him. There is no  alternative."
 
Well, I don't think Susan Haack would agree. She wrote "Deviant logics," as 
 did Quine. But Haack is notably a deviant logician. She taught at the 
University  of Warwick, which is not in Warwick, but in Coventry.
 
McEvoy:

"Though _Logik der Forschung_ may be unread by many on this  list, [Peter 
Cathcart] Wason's work is a reminder of what a profound and  inspiring 
masterpiece it is, with ramifications for the whole field of  knowledge."
 
Did Wason care to read it in the vernacular -- since 'forschung' can  
trigger the very RIGHT implicature!
 
The fascinating thing, too, is that Peter Cathcart Wason and Herbert Paul  
Grice were working at more or less the same time -- or the same year,  1965.

While Wason came up with his selection task, that people failed, Grice  was 
coining 'implicature'. Consider the implicature of 'if' in a formulation of 
 Wason's selection task. 
 
If we say 'if' implies, or implicates, we mean that an utterer of Wason's  
'if' utterance in his selection task IMPLICATES. 

The underlying idea is  that what is literally said -- the logical form and 
the content of an 'if'  utterance, as rendered by the 'horseshoe' used by 
standard logicians -- is not  what is actually meant.
 
For instance, if Clifton teacher’s reply to the question
 
Is Grice a good student?
 
is
 
"He never return library books."
 
the implicature seems to be that 'it depends on what you mean by 'good'".  
(In fact, Grice kept this habit when at Corpus Christi, which almost had him 
 fail in getting his Merton scholarship). 
 
Grice specifies this situation by means of some conversational maxims and a 
 general principle of cooperation, all rooted on what counts as 'rational' 
and  'reasonable'. 
 
According to the 'conversational' maxims -- he is making a joke on Kant  -- 
one’s contribution to the conversation should be adequately informative,  
relevant, not believed to be false by its utterer and generally unambiguous 
and  brief -- as Wason's selection task is not.
 
The cooperative principle (as formulated in Harvard 1967; in his  earlier 
Oxford lectures on "Logic and Conversation" he had spoken of desiderata,  
principles of clarity and candour and desiderata of conversational benevolence  
and self-interest) states that participants expect that each of them will  
make a conversational contribution such as is required, at the stage at 
which it  occurs, by the accepted purpose of the talk exchange.
 
Thus, when an utterer, say, Wason, makes an apparently uninformative  
remark such as "Psychology is psychology", or "Confirmation bias is 
confirmation  
bias" or "Logical adequacy is logical adequacy", the addressee assumes that 
 the utterer (even if he is being Wason) is being cooperative and looks  
for the implicature he is aiming at.
 
We can see how the Gricean conversational implicatures associated with free 
 uses of 'if' (as per Wason's selection task) are non-conventional,  for 
they are is drawn in accordance with pragmatic principles only,  rather than 
involving the meaning of a linguistic expression (notably 'if' --  German 
'ob', as Popper would prefer). 
 
But crucially, on Grice's alternative view, truth and assertibility  
crucially part ways -- that's why in his "Indicative conditionals" he brings in 
 
Dummett and Kripke for good measure, as he discusses the 'paradoxes' of  
'material implication' interpreted in probabilistic terms.
 
According to Grice, in fact, a proposition (such as the 'if' utterance of  
Wason's selection task) can be true, without being assertible.
 
Consider:
 
If spaghetti grow on trees, the Pope is a German.
 
This is vacuously true. But, unless you are Geary, it is not really  
assertible (Geary loves a German pope), because the antecedent is false and the 
 
utterer will mislead his addressee in uttering the corresponding sentence.
 
(As it happens, on April fools' day, in 1957, the year Grice got his  
"Meaning" published, Auntie Beeb had nothing better to do but to broadcast a  
hoax short documentary about the crop of spaghetti. As it happened,  hundreds 
of people contacted Aunt Beeb to ask where they could buy  their own 
spaghetti trees.)
 
This would contradict one of the conversational maxims.
 
Consequently, our wong intuition (yes, there are such things, Virginio)  
that that proposition is false is due, not to its falsity, but to its lack of  
conversational assertibility.
 
However, we could easily think about someone who would assert the previous  
sentence and genuinely believe that the antecedent was true, without 
violating  Grice’s maxim.
 
Be that as it may, since Grice’s theory of implicature has been highly  
influential among both philosophers and psychologists interested in the study 
of  natural language -- and Wason indeed should quote him more often.
 
So, how would a Griceian account for Wason's selection task? 
 
Well, for starters, we would have Grice leaving Oxford and attending one of 
 Wason's seminars in London (he said he would prefer to say at the "Lamb 
and  Flag" or the "Bird and Baby"), and one might say that  when Wason's 'if' 
utterance in Wason's selection task is  asserted, its implicatures sadly 
affect people’s reply to it.
 
Wason SHOULD warn his experimentees: Beware the implicature.
 
Or if you prefer
 
Beware the Implicature, my son!
The jaws that bite, the claws that  catch!
Beware the Disimplicature bird, and shun
The frumious  M-intention!
 
In particular, what we may refer to as "Wason people" (i.e. those who were  
subjected to his experiment) seem to understand the "if" of the conditional 
 sentence to mean "if and only if". Pears recognised this in an issue of 
the  Canadian Journal of Philosophy: "if" standardly implicates "if and only 
if"  (Conditional Perfection, Pears called it)
 
In other words, the 'if' utterance in Wason's selection task might not  
come across as a material implication, but as a bi-conditional, alas. Not as a  
horseshoe, but as something so vernacular that Grice didn't care to list it 
in  his list of 'formal devices' -- he only mentions the dyadic 
truth-functors:  'and', 'or' and 'if' -- the latter being the horseshoe.
 
On this account ("if" implicating "iff") in order to satisfy both the  
conditions put on the "if" sentence in Wason's selection task by each  
“direction
” of the biconditional, one would expect the majority of "the Wason  
people" to choose all the four cards (I know Geary would).
 
Nonetheless, that is contrary to what the data highlight, namely that the  
majority of "The Wason People" (Geary is not one of them) goes for
 
p
 
and
 
q
 
only.
 
As a result, it WOULD seem as if Grice also fails to provide a  suitable 
justification of people’s response to the why "the Wason people" fail  to pass 
Wason's selection task.
 
There have been attempts (surveyed by Grice himself in his "Retrospective  
Epilogue" to WoW) to develop Grice’s conversational implicature as applied 
to  'if' -- which features notably in Wason's selection task.
 
It is generally accepted that the inferential component of communication  
rests very largely on the ability to work out what is and is not 'related'  
(Grice relies on Kant's category of Relation, which he (Grice) turns onto a  
conversational category, as he calls it) in terms of contextual effect, in 
what  people are saying to you (Cara and Girotto apply this to Wason's 
selection  task).
 
Another very influential proposal was given in the framework of  
evolutionary psychology. Believe it or not, Grice was an 'evolutionist', like  
Popper, 
only different. 
 
Thus, Cosmides claims that people -- even the Wason people -- have not  
evolved in such a way that would allow them to perform Wason's  selection task 
successfully.
 
This idea seems to find strong support in experiments conducted with  
different versions of Wason's selection task involving "social  exchange" 
scenarios.
 
In these cases, people’s success in performing the tests highly increases. 
 
An interesting project has been pursued by Oaksford and Chater. They argue  
for a stricter conceptual analysis of Wason's selection task based on  the 
theory of optimal data selection in Bayesian statistics.
 
By applying such standard, they try to justify the claim that the most  
frequent card selections are also the rational ones -- or as Grice might 
prefer,  the 'reasonable' ones.
 
Cheers,

Speranza
 
REFERENCES
 
Grice, Studies in the Way of Words.
-- Aspects of Reason. 
Pears, Motivated Irrationality.
 
 
 
------------------------------------------------------------------
To change your Lit-Ideas settings (subscribe/unsub, vacation on/off,
digest on/off), visit www.andreas.com/faq-lit-ideas.html

  

Other related posts: