[lit-ideas] Re: Motivated Irrationality

  • From: "" <dmarc-noreply@xxxxxxxxxxxxx> (Redacted sender "Jlsperanza" for DMARC)
  • To: lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
  • Date: Fri, 26 Feb 2016 09:36:17 -0500

We are considering Wason's 'A', 'D', '4', and '7'. 

In a message  dated 2/26/2016 6:03:48 A.M. Eastern Standard Time,  
donalmcevoyuk@xxxxxxxxxxx corrects a former slightly misleading exegesis of  
his 
views: "I am not saying "always" - my contention is more measured. I am  saying 
they"
 
the misreasoners
 
"may be getting it 'right for the wrong reason' in the 'A', 'D', '4', '7'  
example discussed."
 
"I am leaving open the wider implications of this. I am not saying there  
are no examples of Wason Tests where people get it right for the right  
reasons."
 
Nice to learn. I love "for the right reason", "for the right reasons" and  
"for the wrong reason" and "for the wrong reasons". I wonder if Scalia used 
any  of these in his discussion on abortion (My Grice-themed thread, "Grice 
is dead,  long live Grice!" was meant as a parody of Scalia's serious, "The 
constitution  is dead, dead, dead", which somewhat flouts Grice's maxim of 
informativeness  since, 'dead dead dead' seems to be a nice figure of 
rhetoric, hyperbole and  emphasis, for what less loquacious utterers would have 
as 
"dead"  simpliciter).

McEvoy:
 
"I am suggesting that the "inner process" of persons doing these tests is  
not manifest."
 
Indeed. I wonder what Wason's philosophy of psychology is. I think he was a 
 behaviourist at heart and that he thought that the display of a test such 
as his  selection task MANIFESTS (to use lingo loved by Witters and 
Anscombe) the  misreasoner's irrationality, or as Wason's prefer 'confirmation 
bias', where  'bias' is like Kuhn's faith, only different.
 
McEvoy:

"while we may be certain whether their answer is correct or  not logically, 
it is far from certain what their psychological "inner process"  is."
 
Indeed. I wonder if Johnson-Laird, who co-authored essays with Wason, is  
more clear on the issue. 
 
McEvoy:

"So far I've left out the 'D' from discussion. My remarks  can be applied 
to the 'D' card, which very few people choose as needing to be  turned over 
i.e. as relevant. For there are two reasons why we might decide  'D' is 
irrelevant - a valid one and an invalid one."
 
Or to use earlier parlance.
 
i. The misreasoner misreasoned for the right reason.
 
ii. The misreasoner misreasoned for the wrong reason.
 
(Are wrong reasons reasons?)
 
McEvoy:

"The invalid one is"
 
iii.  'D' cannot confirm the rule. 
 
"The valid one is:"
 
iv. 'D' cannot disconfirm the rule. 
 
Or as I prefer
 
v. D does not "confirm" the 'if' utterance.
 
and
 
vi. D does not disconfirm the 'if' utterance.
 
Talk of 'can' is modal, and I don't think Wason was into modal logic. There 
 may be less technical keywords than 'confirm' and 'disconfirm' here that 
may  mislead Wason's experimentees less, I'm sure.
 
McEvoy:
 
"It is likely most test-subjects do not psychologically distinguish these  
two 'reasons' and work more 'intuitively'. But logically they are distinct 
and  only one is valid: if people rightly dismiss 'D' as irrelevant because 
it cannot  confirm the rule then they may be doing so for the wrong reason. 
This becomes  clearer if we take the same test but remove the assumption that 
every card has a  number on one side and a letter on the other. Absent this 
assumption, all four  cards must be turned over because it is possible that 
where there is a letter  face-up there is a letter on the other side, and 
where there is a number face-up  there is a number on the other side - and 
such a card would falsify the ['if'  utterance]:
 
vi. If [there is] a vowel [on one side of the card], [there is] an even  
number on the other side.
 
i.e.
 
vii. There is a vowel on one side of the card ⊃ There is an even number on  
the other side of the card
 
or
 
viii. p ⊃ q
 
simpliciter.
 
Agreed.
 
McEvoy:
 
"So, absent this assumption, 'D' becomes logically relevant because it  
could falsify [i.e. DISCONFIRM] the ['if' utterance] - but it  does not become 
relevant because 'D' could now confirm the ['if'  utterance]. My further 
suggestion is that many people get confused here  because they cannot keep 
clearly to the logical distinction between confirmation  and disconfirmation 
and 
may, for example, characterise disconfirmatory potential  as if it's 
confirmatory potential. ([For the record] Some of these [Wason]  people even 
have 
professorships in philosophy."
 
But are they also MBA? Grice have one and was the other?
 
Thanks for the clarification. I'm getting there, I hope. 
 
Cheers,
 
Speranza
 
 
------------------------------------------------------------------
To change your Lit-Ideas settings (subscribe/unsub, vacation on/off,
digest on/off), visit www.andreas.com/faq-lit-ideas.html

Other related posts: