[lit-ideas] Re: Latin help

  • From: epostboxx@xxxxxxxx
  • To: Lit-Ideas <lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Sat, 28 Nov 2020 08:47:00 +0100

On 27. Nov 2020, at 18:19, David Ritchie <profdritchie@xxxxxxxxx> wrote:


...  We wondered after lunch yesterday why sage the herb and sage meaning 
wisdom are yoked together in English.

Once you get past the pages of varieties, here you’ll find an assertion that 
“sage” comes from the Latin, salvere, for “save,” as in saving lives. ... 
But a different site here says that sage the herb comes from Latin salvia/ 
salvus meaning healthy, whole, well-kept. ... Both sites write as if that’s 
the truth.  ...

I vaguely remember a quotation about etymology - something to the effect that 
it is 'one of the most creative of the arts' but I can't seem to formulate an 
internet search that yields a satisfactory result. Can anyone help me (with 
that search, or by providing the quotation)?

It has been my experience that what is put forward as etymological scholarship 
is often skewed by a fancy or thesis which biases the author's choice for word 
or name origins (sometimes mightily). An extreme example of this (somewhere) on 
my bookshelves (which I will ferret out if any interest is shown) is a 
dictionary of the origins of german place names, in which virtually every 
appellation is traced to a term related to water. (If I remember correctly, the 
author openly states this 'thesis' somewhere in a foreword or other opening 
remark.)

Chris Bruce,
sipping a cup of sage tea (which
along with sage bonbons is a popular
remedy for sore throat here),
in Kiel, Germany
- -------------------------------------------------------------------
To change your Lit-Ideas settings (subscribe/unsub, vacation on/off,
digest on/off), visit www.andreas.com/faq-lit-ideas.html

Other related posts: