[lit-ideas] Knowing That and Ignoring Whether

  • From: Jlsperanza@xxxxxxx
  • To: lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
  • Date: Sun, 29 Dec 2013 19:28:09 -0500 (EST)

McEvoy: "JLS may wish to read one of Popper's papers collected in  
"Conjectures and Refutations": "On the Sources of Knowledge and of Ignorance."  
Or 
not."
 
One nice passage:

Popper:

"Socrates himself does not pretend to know."
 
"His attitude is described by Aristotle in the words,"

"Socrates  raised questions but gave no answers.

For he confessed that he DID NOT  KNOW' (he ignored)"


--
 
cfr.
 
i. Socrates ignores.
ii. Socrates ignores whether he ignores.
 

Sophist. El., 183b7; cpo Theaetetus, IS0c-d, IS7c, 16Ib.) 

Popper: "Thus Socrates’ maieutic is not an art that aims at teaching any  
belief, but one that aims at purging or cleansing (cf. the allusion to the  
Amphidromia in Theaetetus 160e; cpo Phaedo 67b, 69b/ c) the soul of its false 
 beliefs, its seeming knowledge, its prejudices."

"It achieves this  by teaching us to doubt our own convictions."
 
This may relate to Walter O.'s earlier:
 
"I submit that the idea of "false knowledge" is self-contradictory. If  I  
k-that
P, then P can't be false. If P is false, then I  don't/can't k-that P.  
(Although
I can of course k-that P is  false.)"
 
It seems there is a nice, and important, grammatical distinction, then,  
between:
 
knowing-that
 
and 
 
ignoring-that
 
(on the one hand)
 
"He ignores that the earth is round -- implicating: the earth IS  round)
 
and
 
ignoring-that
 
and the more crucial
 
ignoring whether
 
Thus,
 
Socrates ignored. (In an expanded version: For any proposition p, Socrates  
ignores that p; versus: for any proposition p, Socrates ignores WHETHER p 
is  true (or not)). 
 
And he possibly ignored whether he ignored. Or not.
 
Cheers,
 
Speranza


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