[lit-ideas] Re: Induced to Inductivism

  • From: "" <dmarc-noreply@xxxxxxxxxxxxx> (Redacted sender "Jlsperanza" for DMARC)
  • To: lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
  • Date: Sun, 14 Feb 2016 13:32:27 -0500

In a message dated 2/14/2016 5:04:28 A.M. Eastern Standard Time,  
donalmcevoyuk@xxxxxxxxxxx notes:
 
"What Popper claims is that the logic needed to evaluate the 'system of  
scientific statements' is purely deductive (where evaluation is based in part 
on  understanding the deductive relations between statements). What Popper 
nowhere  suggests is that this 'system of scientific statements' is 'arrived 
at' purely  by deduction - far from it: no empirical statement can arrived 
at purely by  logical deduction. Thus the "process" by which we arrive at a 
(provisional)  'system of scientific statements' is NOT a "PURELY deductive 
process". As  someone with some understanding of Popper's views, I am also 
familiar with the  frequent attempts by others to outline Popper's views and 
with their frequent  failure to get even the basics right."
 
Well, the same happened with Grice. Not all recognise he is a genius (I  
think 95%, inductively, do)
 
McEvoy:

"This frequent failure is hard to fully explain. Consider  the above 
example: it is fairly orthodox philosophically (and logically) to  accept that 
empirical statements cannot ever be 'arrived at' purely by deduction  - for how 
can we ever deduce, from deductive logic alone, anything that can only  be 
true given contingent (empirical/testable) facts? Therefore, it would seem  
absurd to attribute to a first-rate logician and philosopher like Popper, a  
position that denies this and which asserts, on the contrary, that "Science 
in  Popper's view is a PURELY deductive process". Yet this absurdity is 
exactly what  JLS attributes to Popper as "Popper's views". It is not even 
close - it's a  travesty of "Popper's views"."

I like the keyword 'travesty'. Obviously from the Italian,  "travestire", 
"to disguise," from Latin trans- "over" + vestire "to clothe". The  Italians 
(Venetians?) also gave Western civilisation the idea of a  "transvestite" 
(Venetians), defined, during the carnival season, as the "person  with a 
strong desire to dress in clothing of the opposite sex". Venetians claim  the 
custom comes from Ancient Rome -- they always adjudicate most customs to  
Romans -- and Nero in particular -- who would hardly use his 'toga  virilis'.
 
McEvoy: "No wonder people who are taken in by this kind of travesty also do 
 not take Popper's position as passing muster or as worthy of serious and  
prolonged consideration. But some of us know different, and suggest Popper's 
 views (old and unfashionable as they might appear, like Bach's music or 
Hume's  attack on induction as a form of "logic") are worthy of such  
consideration."
 
One good critic seems to be Ivor Grattan-Guinness, in his "Karl Popper and  
the 'The Problem of Induction': A Fresh Look at the Logic of Testing 
Scientific  Theories", in Erkenntnis, vol. 60.
 
 
Ivor Owen Grattan-Guinness is a historian of logic. Since Bartleby defines  
Grice as a "British logician", we could, a fortiori, say that 
Grattan-Guinness  is a philosopher.
 
Grattan-Guinness was born in Bakewell, England.
 
(The town is famed for its cooks).
 
Grattan-Guinness's father was a mathematics teacher and educational  
administrator.
 
Grattan-Guinness gained his bachelor degree as a Mathematics Scholar  at 
Wadham  and, more importantly from a Popperian point of view, an MSc  (Econ) 
in Mathematical Logic and the Philosophy of Science at the London School  of 
Economic.
 
Grattan-Guinness gained both the doctorate (PhD) higher doctorate (D.Sc.)  
in the History of Science at the University of London. 
 
Grattan-Guinness is Emeritus Professor of the History of Logic at  
Middlesex [not to be confused with Middle-Sex) University, and a Visiting  
Research 
Associate at the London School of Economics.
 
Grattan-Guinness was awarded the Kenneth O. May Medal for services to the  
History of Mathematics by the International Commission on the History of  
Mathematics (ICHM) at Budapest, on the occasion of the 23rd International  
Congress for the History of Science.
 
He was elected an Honorary Member of The Bertrand Russell Society, a club  
to revere the well-known philosopher born in England or Wales.
 
Grattan-Guinness spent much of his career at Middlesex (not to be confused  
with Middle-Sex).
 
He is a Fellow at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New  
Jersey, USA, and a member of the International Academy of the History of  
Science.
 
Grattan-Guinness is the editor of the history of science journal  "Annals 
of Science". 
 
In also  founded the journal "History and Philosophy of  Logic," which he 
edited.
 
He was an associate editor of Historia Mathematica from its  inception.
 
He acted as advisory editor to the editions of the writings of C.S. Peirce  
and Bertrand Russell, and to several other journals and book series. 
 
He is a member of the Executive Committee of the International Commission  
on the History of Mathematics 
 
Grattan-Guinness gave over 570 invited lectures to organisations and  
societies, or to conferences and congresses -- some about Poppers, some not  
("surely you can implicate that" -- Geary) in over 20 countries around the  
world. 
 
These lectures include tours undertaken in Australia, New Zealand, Italy,  
South Africa and Portugal.

Grattan-Guinness is the President of the British Society for the  History 
of Mathematics.
 
He was elected an effective member of the Académie Internationale  
d'Histoire des Sciences. 
 
He was the Associate Editor for mathematicians and statisticians for the  
Oxford Dictionary of National Biography.
 
Grattan-Guinness took an interest in the phenomenon of coincidence and has  
written on it for The Society For Psychical Research. 
 
Grattan-Guinness claimes to have a recurrent affinity with one  particular 
number, namely the square of 15 (225), even recounting one occasion  when a 
car was in front of him with the number plate IGG225, i.e. his very  
initials and that number. 
 
The work of Grattan-Guinness touches on all historical periods, but he  
specialised in the development of the calculus and mathematical analysis, and  
their applications to mechanics and mathematical physics, and in the rise of 
set  theory and mathematical logic.
 
He also is fascinated by Popper's attacks on inductivism.
 
Grattan-Guiness is especially interested in characterising how past  
thinkers, far removed from us in time, view their findings differently from the 
 
way we see them now (for example, Euclid). 
 
Like Geary, Grattan-Guiness has emphasised the importance of  "ignorance" 
as an epistemological notion in this task (vide Socrates).
 
Grattan-Guiness did extensive research with original sources both published 
 and unpublished, thanks to his reading and spoken knowledge of the main  
languages of Europe.
 
He is the author of "The Development of the Foundations of Mathematical  
Analysis from Euler to Riemann". MIT Press; 'Joseph Fourier, 1768–1830' (In  
collaboration with J.R. Ravetz). MIT Press, "Dear Russell—Dear Jourdain: a  
Commentary on Russell's Logic, Based on His Correspondence with Philip  
Jourdain", Duckworth; :From the Calculus to Set Theory, 1630–1910: An  
Introductory History, Duckworth; Psychical Research: A Guide to Its  History, 
Principles & Practices - in celebration of 100 years of the Society  for 
Psychical 
Research, Aquarian Press; Convolutions in French Mathematics,  1800–1840' in 
3 Vols. Birkhauser.
1997. The Rainbow of Mathematics: A History  of the Mathematical Sciences. 
Fontana; From the Calculus to Set Theory  1630–1910: An Introductory 
History; The Search for Mathematical Roots,  1870–1940: Logics, Set Theories, 
and 
the Foundations of Mathematics from Cantor  through Russell to Gödel. 
Princeton University Press (For research on this book  he held a Leverhulme 
Fellowship from 1995 to 1997); Routes of Learning:  Highways, Pathways, and 
Byways 
in the History of Mathematics. Johns Hopkins  University Press. W.H. and 
G.C. Young, The theory of sets of points, 2nd edition  (ed., New York: 
Chelsea). [Introduction and appendix.] E.L. Post, ‘The modern  paradoxes’, 
History 
and philosophy of logic, 11; Philip E. B. Jourdain, Selected  essays on the 
history of set theory and logics (1906–1918) (Bologna: CLUEB),  xlii + 352 
pages. George Boole, Selected manuscripts on logic and its philosophy  (ed. 
with G. Bornet, Basel: Birkhäuser), 

"The Search for Mathematical Roots 1870–1940" is a sweeping study of  the 
rise of mathematical logic during that critical period. 
 
The central theme of the book is the rise of logicism, thanks to the  
efforts of Frege, Bertrand Russell, and Alfred Whitehead, and its demise due to 
 
Gödel and indifference. 
 
Whole chapters are devoted to the emergence of algebraic logic in the 19th  
century UK, Cantor and the emergence of set theory, the emergence of  
mathematical logic in Germany told in a way that downplays Frege's importance,  
and to Peano and his followers. 
 
There follow four chapters devoted to the ideas of the young Bertrand  
Russell, the writing of both The Principles of Mathematics and Principia  
Mathematica, and to the mixed reception the ideas and methods encountered over  
the period 1910–40. 
 
The book touches on the rise of model theory as well as proof theory, and  
on the emergence of American research on the foundation of mathematics,  
especially in the hands of E. H. Moore and his students, of the postulate  
theorists, and of Quine. 
 
While Polish logic is often mentioned, it is not covered systematically. 
 
Grattan-Guinness's essay is a contribution to the history of philosophy as  
well as of mathematics.

He has also edited Companion Encyclopedia of the History and Philosophy of  
the Mathematical Sciences, 2 vols. Johns Hopkins University Press,  
Landmark Writings in Western Mathematics. Elsevier.
 
Among his many essays, including the crucial attack on Popper's simplistic  
views on inductivism, include:
 
Christianity and Mathematics: Kinds of Link and the Rare Occurrences after  
1750." Physis: Rivista Internazionale di Storia della Scienza XXXVII. Nuova 
 Serie. Fasc. 2. 
"Manifestations of Mathematics in and around the Christianities: Some  
Examples and Issues." Historia Scientiarum 11-1. 
A Sideways Look at Hilbert's Twenty-Three Problems of 1900, Notices of the  
American Mathematical Society 47: 
"Foundations of Mathematics and Logicism," in Michel Weber and Will Desmond 
 (eds.), Handbook of Whiteheadian Process Thought, Frankfurt / Lancaster, 
Ontos  Verlag: 97-104. 
 
Cf. Michel Weber, « Ivor Grattan-Guinness, "Algebras, Projective Geometry,  
Mathematical Logic, and Constructing the World. Intersections in the 
Philosophy  of Mathematics of A.N. Whitehead", Historia Mathematica 29, N° 
4,pp. 
427-462 »,  Zentralblatt MATH, European Mathematical Society, 
Fachinformationszentrum  Karlsruhe & Springer-Verlag, 1046.00003.
 
Cheers,
 
Speranza
 
 
------------------------------------------------------------------
To change your Lit-Ideas settings (subscribe/unsub, vacation on/off,
digest on/off), visit www.andreas.com/faq-lit-ideas.html

Other related posts: