[lit-ideas] In the tradition of Kantotle

  • From: "" <dmarc-noreply@xxxxxxxxxxxxx> (Redacted sender "jlsperanza" for DMARC)
  • To: lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
  • Date: Sun, 19 Feb 2017 12:37:43 -0500

McEvoy writes in his provocative "Positives and negatives of 'positivism':

"A large part of W[itters]'s story is, however, how his philosophy has been 
repeatedly hijacked by academic philosophers inclined to anti-metaphysical 
positivism. Of course, the term 'positivism' has an almost laughable history, 
and some might argue it is unhelpful a term."

I think it was once popular in France with Comte and his followers. 
Twentieth-century philosophers wanted to distinguish THEIR type of positivism 
from Comte's, by prefacing it with the adjective "logical" (as in Ayer's 
classic compilation, "Logical Positivism").

McEvoy: 

"Yet we can characterise the modern problems of philosophy in terms of struggle 
between forms of 'positivism' [empiricism, logical positivism, versions of 
linguistic positvism, functionalism] and anti-positivism."

-- which is, anti-positivism, that is -- different from 'negativism'. I think 
Comte's motivation behind _his_ 'positivism' rested on the idea of progress.

McEvoy:



"It may be said that the 'Linguistic Turn' in philosophy was much less radical 
than it might appear in that, in most hands, it consisted in replacing an 
untenable form of 'Logical Positivism,' which, anyway, was predicated on a 
linguistic thesis as to how verifiability provided a criterion of sense] with a 
more diffuse but also untenable form of 'Linguistic Positivism' [predicated on 
the explicit or implicit assumption that standards of correct use of language 
also provide correct markers of what makes sense in terms of any metaphysical 
questions."

Mundle, a Welsh philosopher, has a nice Clarendon, "Critique of linguistic 
philosophy". I disagree with the label 'linguistic positivism'. If we are 
referring to the mis-called "Oxford school of ordinary philosophy," there was 
such a variety of views -- P. F. Strawson, J. L. Austin, H. P. Grice, R. M. 
Hare, J. O. Urmson, to name a few -- that it would be unfair to characterise 
them as _sharing_ a view. If we focus as we should on Austin (the senior of 
them all), ONE thesis that was possibly shared was some respect for 'ordinary 
language,' as spoken in Oxford by philosophy dons -- which is never _that_ 
ordinary, you know. I would place Ryle in a different category, although he is 
often labelled as an 'ordinary language philosopher', and even of the Oxford 
school, but since he never attended a Saturday morning meeting led by Austin, 
he doesn't count.

McEvoy:





"My suggestion is that both W[itters] and P[opper] are anti-positivists. 
However, they have been frequently interpreted in a positivistic way - partly 
because a core of their thinking seeks to achieve what many philosophers think 
can only be achieved by a form of positivism. A useful starting point is Kant's 
question "What is metaphysics?" The tendency of positivism is to deny that 
metaphysics has any real subject-matter e.g. to treat its apparent 
subject-matter as reducible to some form of factual discourse such as 'natural 
science' [this was the thesis of the Logical Positivists] or the facts of human 
discourse generally [this is the thesis of 'Linguistic Positivism']."

This was Heidegger's question, too! Alas, his answer includes proposition like 
"The nothing noths," which did not help. In Oxford, it was _Aristotle_'s view 
of metaphysics that was only seriously considered. Although it is true that, in 
fairness to Oxford tutees, P. F. Strawson dedicated a whole term to Kant's 
metaphysics (he entitled his lectures, "The bounds of sense," translating 
Kantian jargon into ordinary language, almost.

McEvoy:


"The pretensions and exaggerations of much metaphysical speculation almost 
inevitably produce a reaction in a positivist direction: Kant's view was that 
what philosophy needs to do is clamp down on empty highflown metaphysical 
speculation but without painting its own legitimate activities into a corner so 
tight that it becomes negligble or non-existent. Kant believed the problem is 
that there is great depth to our universe in terms of correctly understanding 
it (metaphysically) but also great limits on our ability to penetrate into 
these depths. In Popper's view, Kant was right was about this. I think 
Wittgenstein also was profoundly Kantian in these terms (though the evidence is 
more equivocal) - in W's view the depths were not illusory, what was illusory 
was the sense of our attempts to express these depths in language."

Well, in Oxford, defining 'metaphysics' became a sport -- notably led by D. F. 
Pears, who organised a whole "Third programme" (BBC) lecture to "Metaphysics" 
(later published by Macmillan). Among the contributors was H. P. Grice. The 
Macmillan volume pays tribute to many more metaphysicians than Aristotle and 
Kant -- there is a delightful fragment on Collingwood's views on metaphysics as 
presuppositions, for example. Years earlier, J. O. Urmson had tried to make it 
clear to an Oxford audience what the _metaphysics_ of, say, the early Witters, 
was, in "Philosophical Analysis: its development between the two worlds." 

Urmson notes that one postulate of this metaphysics was that the world is all 
that is the case. He gives an example:

i. Paul took off his trousers and went to bed.
ii. Paul went to bed and took off his trousers.

In a positivistic metaphysics, of course, "p & q" and "q & p" describe the same 
'molecular' picture. If it is the case that (i), it is the case that (ii), and 
vice versa. The last part of Urmson's treatise (as also the last part of G. J. 
Warnock, "English philosophy in the twentieth century") ends with a summary of 
Strawson's view in "Introduction to Logical Theory," which may be seen as 
anti-positivistic. For Strawson argued that the logical ampersand and the 
ordinary English conjunction 'and' trigger different implicatures (not his 
word), and should be categorised independently. Oddly, Strawson does not give 
an early example by Ryle on this:

iii. Paul took a pill and died.
iv. Paul died and took a pill.

In the "metaphysics" of the "Tractatus", (iii) and (iv) are indeed equivalent 
(vide Black's brilliant companion -- to the Tractatus that is -- not on his 
journey to Alaska). 

McEvoy:

"Agassi once suggested that the divisions between Wittgensteinians and 
Popperians are due to them both contesting the legacy of Bertrand Russell; but 
I would suggest it is much more accurate that the divisions between 
Wittgenstein and Popper have very little do with the legacy of Russell and 
almost everything to do with the legacy of Kant."

Well, while Grice did give the Immanuel Kant lectures at Stanford (for some 
reason -- who instituted them there, and why?), one of his favourite 
unpublications was:

"Definite descriptions in Russell and in the vernacular."

Russell was paradeigmatic of the Oxonian approach just because Strawson had 
dared challenge his (Russell's) account of 'the' in "On referring", getting the 
appropriate retort ("Mr. Strawson on referring", by Russell, repr. in his 
Essays in Analysis). This shows, by the way, that the Oxford atmosphere was 
uniform. We have Strawson criticising Russell's metaphysics, but Grice coming 
to the rescue!

McEvoy: "This kind of 'depth'-Kantianism - the kind where Kant could assert 
that the universe consists of 'noumena' that are fundamentally unknowable - 
provokes much resistance on many grounds: it seems to grossly exaggerate the 
unknowability of reality and it seems to posit a depth so unknowable that we 
might just as well be sceptical of there being any such depth as be sceptical 
of our capacity to know. There is little doubt that the feeling or belief that 
'we know a lot' is much more intuitive and acceptable to many than the view 
that 'we know nothing for certain and very little otherwise'. Many cultural and 
historical developments favour epistemic self-belief and optimism, and work 
against the view that reality is much 'deeper' than our knowledge of it. Those 
resistant to the this idea of 'metaphysical depth' are, in my guesstimate, in 
the majority among academic philosophers - the depths that some acknowledge 
tend only to be of quite a shallow kind [e.g. Strawson's reading of Kant]"

-- hey, it was just a compilation of lectures for Oxonians, and "only the poor 
learn at Oxford," as Arnold would complan ("Oxford Dictionary of Quotations"). 
Plus, he (Strawson) knew that Methuen (his publisher) would publish anything he 
would offer them!

But Strawson's "Bounds of Sense" at least left a mark on C. A. B. Peacocke's 
later reflections on the limits of intelligibility (which is what 'bounds of 
sense' means, anyway).

McEvoy:

"and in some there is really no depth to anything at all [e,g. A.J. Ayer's 
reworking of Humean 'positivism']. Against this kind of background, Popper's 
theory of "World 3" is hardly taken seriously by most philosophers even though 
it is a far more serious and profound idea that any they will ever publish: it 
is far too 'metaphysical' and implies that there is a metaphysical depth to the 
universe beyond the interaction of human minds and bodies. Can metaphysical 
'depth' be demonstrated? Not conclusively. Can it be argued for cogently? The 
most cogent set of arguments demonstrating metaphysical 'depth' given by any 
modern philosopher in the Anglo-American sphere [so I exclude Heidegger here] 
are those from Popper, yet this aspect of Popper's work - its most 'profound' 
aspect - is the least known and understood by the educated public."

Perhaps partly to blame here is Chomsky. He, not a philosopher, turned into 
fashionable labels things like 'deep' and 'surface' -- (as in 'deep structure' 
and 'surface structure'). It is true that Witters had spoken of "Depth 
grammar". But in general, it is true, the analytic variety of philosophers 
prefer to just waddle in the shallow berths of the seas of language (to echo 
both H. P. Grice and Kripke -- "Naming and Necessity", analysing, "Socrates was 
called 'Socrates'"). 




McEvoy:



"The educated public mostly know of a Popper whose main theses lend themselves 
to a 'positivistic' outlook: e.g. that 'science is established by a criterion 
of falsifiability' - whereas Popper's profound claims are anti-positivistic: 
that science is not 'established' at all in the terms usually assumed, that 
empirical falsifiability equates with testability in scientific terms but not 
proof, that this (properly understood) helps clarify the line between science 
and metaphysics, that science is located within metaphysical research 
programmes, and that a "tottering old metaphysician" like himself can throw 
critical light on science and knowledge generally by work that is unabashedly 
'metaphysical'."

Pity he spent more time with criticising Plato than reading Aristotle's 
monumental work on "metaphysics". For the Oxonian, metaphysics can be roughly 
be divided in two branches: ontology proper, and 'eschatology', or the study of 
category barriers (as when we proceed by analogical reasoning). The 'ontology' 
is deemed by the Oxonian to be reflected in the categorical structure of 
language (Greek, English). Grice was so optimistic about the continuity between 
Aristotle and Oxford that he speaks of the "Athenian dialectic" and the 
"Oxonian dialectic" as being more or less on the same target: to explain 'ta 
legomena' (what most people say -- 'hoi polloi'). 

It is true that, "at the end of the day," Grice's favourite philosopher was not 
Aristotle, but Kantotle (vide J. F. Bennett, "In the tradition of Kantotle," 
Times Literary Supplement -- a review of P. G. R. I. C. E., philosophical 
grounds of rationality: intentions, categories, ends).


McEvoy:


"The strain of thought found in most Wittgensteinians or students of 
Wittengenstein also contains a 'positivistic' hostility to metaphysics that is 
not, in my view, a hostility found in Wittegenstein - what W was hostile to was 
not metaphysics but metaphysical talk (which descends typically into nonsense 
in W's view)."


As when we say,

"A horse looks like a horse"

which presupposes the deeper metaphysical (eschatological) question: what is 
the conceptual analyses of 'similarity' and 'identity'.

McEvoy:

"Yet many of his students interpret W as if W intended and succeeded in 
dismantling the supposed depths of metaphysics - whereas, I suggest, the 
correct interpretation is that W never intended anything like this but instead 
intended to dismantle the supposed depths of 'metaphysical talk'."

A bit like letting the fly out of the fly-bottle.

McEvoy:

"These various remarks may lead us back to explore the fundamental questions: 
is there genuine metaphysical subject-matter, has its depths, and what may we 
do to tackle these issues?"

Well, when Grice was compiling his "Studies in the Way of Words," he managed to 
talk 'metaphysics'. He entitled Part II "Semantics and Metaphysics", which was 
provocative (most were expecting something like "Pragmatics"). And he further 
managed to include his latest metaphysical reflection where he defines this 
much needed new branch of metaphysics, 'eschatology' ('philosophical 
eschatology,' he calls it, to distinguish from the more common 'theological' 
one). One of his favourite unpublications, to boot, was, "From Genesis to 
Revelations, being an examination on a new discourse for metaphysics."

Cheers,

Speranza

Other related posts: