[lit-ideas] "In die hodierno incedit crastinus" (Was: Latin mottos)

  • From: Jlsperanza@xxxxxxx
  • To: lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
  • Date: Fri, 28 May 2004 12:51:21 EDT

D. Ritchie writes:
>> A friend wants to know what this means.  Having insufficient  Latin even 
for
>> the minin' (remember Peter Cooke on judges?), I can't  help.  Can anyone? 
>> IN DIE HODIERNO INCEDIT  CRASTINUS
P. A. Stone replies:
> It seems like a   procrastinator's motto: 
> "Each day, another day will come  tomorrow?"
> Sort of pointing out the obvious, like, wherever you go,  there you are.
> Maybe there was a latin Robert Fulghum.

D. Ritchie: 
>I'll pass this on...
>tomorrow or the next  day.

Mmmm. More like "Tomorrow is another day"? Or, even "There's always  
tomorrow"? Note that 'crastinus' is nominative, so it must be the subject of 
the  
sentence. "Incedit" sounds like 'present tense indicative', to me: 'fall'? 'in  
die hodierno' would be the dative construction, 'today'. So:  Literally:  "In 
the day today falls tomorrow", or 'In the day today, tomorrow has an  
incidence'. 'Tomorrow falls already today's', if you wish, 'Today's already  
tomorrow?' 
if you must. 
Quite the opposite of "Seize the day" -- Carpe diem.
Cheers,
JL


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