[lit-ideas] Re: Implicatures and Explicatures

  • From: "Donal McEvoy" <dmarc-noreply@xxxxxxxxxxxxx> (Redacted sender "donalmcevoyuk" for DMARC)
  • To: "lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx" <lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Fri, 29 Sep 2017 10:42:30 +0000 (UTC)

1. >the return of price&gopper>
This is hardly worth saying except by way of "implicature" - where it might be 
taken to imply (a) "price and gopper" may be lumped together as a double-act to 
be belittled (b) their "return" is not welcomed. Etc.

2. > we are all waiting for the discovery that Hugh Hefner was implicating that 
he liked women>
Hardly true. Also hardly worth saying unless read as an "implicature" in a 
sarcastic vein e.g. we are expecting a great announcement showing some 
implicating applies to HH, ha ha, etc.
3. It is ironic that these remarks, at 1 and 2, are so reliant on "implicature" 
for their import, while appearing bored to death with Grice. 

4. These remarks by Palma do not amount to any semblance of serious examination 
of whether there is any such thing as "implicature", and related questions as 
to its role, its character, and its importance (say, in addressing questions of 
"meaning"). 

5. But then the issues at 4 may involve difficult questions while sarky 
implicature is comparatively easy.

6. Let's stick to sarky implicature!*
D*See what I've done there?


      From: adriano paolo shaul gershom palma <palmaadriano@xxxxxxxxx>
 To: "lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx" <lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx> 
 Sent: Friday, 29 September 2017, 8:15
 Subject: [lit-ideas] Implicatures and Explicatures
   
the return of price&gopperwe are all waiting for the discovery that Hugh Hefner 
was implicating that he liked women, also t
palma,   apgs



On Fri, Sep 29, 2017 at 5:35 AM, Redacted sender jlsperanza for DMARC 
<dmarc-noreply@xxxxxxxxxxxxx> wrote:

There is something Griceian about Yeats – and in fact,there is something 
Griceian about the Irish government – or something Irishgovernmental about 
Grice – your pick. But the good news is that at long last the Irish government 
has intervenedto save some personal effects of W. B. Yeats, an Irish poet, from 
sale. (Thecoincidence is that both H. P. Grice and W. B. Yeats went by 
initials). 

Amid fears that culturally significant items thatbelonged to W. B. Yeats (not 
H. P. Grice) would be sold, the Irish government itself(or ‘themselves,’ as 
Grice implicates – ‘surery there’s more than oneindividual, in Strawson’s usage 
of this Aristotelian term of art that the Irishgovernment must involve” – 
Strawson, “Individuals: an essay in descriptivemetaphysics) announced it had 
secured the purchase of a portion of thecollection ahead of an auction.

Over 200 lots of paintings, sketches and personaleffects from Yeats and his 
family members were sold in an auction at Sotheby’s,fetching $2.7 million.

However, Yeats’s writing bureau sold to a privatebidder for five times the 
estimated auction price. (“And what am I goingto do with it, now?” she 
protested). 

But the most valuable lot in the sale, a cache oflove letters between Yeats and 
one Olivia Shakespear failed to sell. (Yeatsconstantly misspells Olivia’s 
surname as “Shakespeare,” “for implicatureeffect,” Grice annotates).

The Irish arts minister, Heather Humphreys, has nowannounced that her 
department had provided $763,000, in funding to the NationalMuseum of Ireland 
and the National Library of Ireland to buy “significant itemsof the collection” 
– where she is using ‘item’ and ‘significant’ alla Peirce –on whom Grice 
lectured – and on behalf of the Irish state. (For surely theIrish state cannot 
be _present_ -- cfr. the recent controversy as to whether ariver can sue). 
The library and the museum – or rather the people ‘working’therein -- selected 
the items for purchase themselves, and they were withdrawnfrom the auction in 
advance. 

The items acquired by the museum include veryGriceian objects-d’art:a 
walnuttable, a Burmese chest in which Yeats stored manuscriptsa seriesof 
Japanese masks, and acollection of objects that show the influence of occultism 
and spiritualism onYeats’s oeuvre (“if any,” Grice adds for implicature effect.)
The announcement that the Irish government wouldintervene was made after 
high-profile Irish literary, artistic and academicfigures decried the sale – in 
a BIG EXPLICATRE!! -- as a great loss to thecountry’s cultural heritage.

Christopher Morash, of Trinity (where Donleavy’s “Gingerman” attended, and 
indeed Donleavy his self) was one of many who urged the governmentto keep the 
collection within (rather than without) Ireland. 

Morash says: "Iam delighted to see that the Irish government acted so promptly, 
and wisely,too, in allowing the key cultural institutions to decide which 
significantitems are most important to preserve in public ownership.”

A letter was signed by Morash along with otheracademics and Irish luminaries, 
including Marie Heaney, Paul Muldoon andMichael Longley, which (the letter, 
that is) called on the Irish government toprevent the collection being sold.

“Preserving such a collection for the benefit ofIreland has to be within the 
power of the Irish government and the nationalinstitutions concerned,” the 
letter reads (or rather, one reads as one readsthe letter – “but ‘a letter 
reads’ triggers the right implicature,” Griceallows. “It’s a metaphor, in 
essence.”)

"Once the collection is broken up and sold, thechance will not come again,” the 
letter reads.

An op-ed in “The Irish Times” before the auctionsays:

"Far too much of Ireland’s literary heritagehas made its way into private 
individuals” (where the usage is, again, allaStrawson’s “Individuals: an essay 
in descriptive metaphysics.”)

A statement from the department of culture said theIrish government’s action 
was not a last-minute intervention and had been inthe works for some time (“if 
not centuries,” Grice jokes).

“Over the past nine months, I have been workingwith the National Library and 
the National Museum to ensure the purchase forthe Irish state of significant 
items, as identified by both institutions, whichwere due to be auctioned,” 
Humphreys says.  
Humphrey adds that, over the past years, the Irishstate has acquired material 
from the Yeats family collection worth a total ofapproximately €4 million. 
(“Wow,” Grice implicated). 

Adrian Paterson, of The National University ofIreland, Galway and another 
signatory to the letter to the department ofculture, says that while the 
state’s intervention is welcome, it does not gofar enough (Grice glosses: “He 
possibly implicates: ‘what happens at Trinity,stays at Trinity.”)

“This is not a victory for Ireland but at best afighting retreat,” Paterson 
adds.“It doesnot keep the collection together.” – implicating this is a bad 
thing – cfr. theGrice collection, dispersed all over the globe.

"The chance to acquire from the Yeats familyhome will never come again,” he 
added, uttering what Aristotle calls a futurecontingent, “but giving it the air 
of an analytic statement,” Grice adds,quoting from his “Defense of a dogma,” 
co-written with Strawson. (Popper deniedanalyticity to ‘chance’ statements).

The items came from The Cliff House, the home of W.B. Yeats’s son, Michael 
Yeats. 

The sale was made by W. B. Yeats’s threegrandchildren, who have donated 
(rather) items from their family’s estate toIrish cultural institutions in the 
past.

The family sold correspondence between W. B. Yeatsand James Joyce (whom Popper 
mentions in terms of his ‘stream-of-consciousness’,that Kerouac borrowed from 
Neal Cassady) to Ireland’s National Library, and theIrish government provided 
€500,000 (in cash) toward the sale. 

However, the Irish government was criticised (thereare always Griceian critics) 
for passing up the opportunity to purchase thesurrender letter of Padraig 
Pearse, leader of the Easter Rising, when it wentup for auction in Dublin. 
(This letter does not compare to Cassady’s, incidentally--). 

“Ireland uses its remarkable pre-eminence inliterature and art to sell itself 
around the world,” Paterson adds, “if I canspeak crudely,” he adds for 
explicatural effect. 

“It is a shame that this has not been matched bysufficient conviction of its 
worth at home,” where by ‘home’ he does not meanHIS home, but His Home, if you 
catch the Griceian implicature – or even if you don’t!Incidentally,the most 
Griceian of Yeats’s poems is memorised by ‘heart’ by Griceians 
ofcourse!Cheers,Speranza



   

Other related posts: