[lit-ideas] Re: Human beings.

  • From: "Kahn, Rupert" <R.D.Kahn@xxxxxxxxx>
  • To: <lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Wed, 5 Sep 2007 21:54:52 +0100

More on gerunds
http://www.stcustards.free-online.co.uk/topp/latin/latin2.htm
Enjoy
 
Rupert 
Sheffield


________________________________

From: lit-ideas-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx [mailto:lit-ideas-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On 
Behalf Of Mike Geary
Sent: 05 September 2007 21:27
To: lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: [lit-ideas] Re: Human beings.


But what about verb words that are not gerunds?  Is the noun 'hit' derived from 
a once metaphorical use of the verb 'hit'? and what of 'kick' and 'run' and 
'balk' and 'bother' and 'stroll' -- were they originally nouns or verbs?  What 
about expressions such as "a god-send".  I don't know the answer to these 
questions. can you answer them for me?  Hey, there's another one!  They're like 
flies -- oh, no, is that one too?
 
Mike Geary
nouning verbs in Memphis  
 
 
 
 
 
 

        ----- Original Message ----- 
        From: Lawrence Helm <mailto:lawrencehelm@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx>  
        To: lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx 
        Sent: Wednesday, September 05, 2007 8:48 AM
        Subject: [lit-ideas] Re: Human beings.

         
        When verbs function as nouns they are called gerunds, e.g., "asking" in 
"do you mind my asking you?" [example from the Oxford Dictionary of English]
         
        Lawrence.
         
         
         
        ------------Original Message------------
        From: "Andreas Ramos" <andreas@xxxxxxxxxxx>
        To: lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
        Date: Tue, Sep-4-2007 8:44 PM
        Subject: [lit-ideas] Re: Human beings.
         
        Does this work the other way around? Do verbs turn into nouns?
         
        yrs,
        andreas
        www.andreas.com
         
         
        ----- Original Message ----- 
        From: "Robert Paul" <rpaul@xxxxxxxx>
        To: <lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
        Sent: Tuesday, September 04, 2007 8:09 PM
        Subject: [lit-ideas] Re: Human beings.
         
         
        >>> I just heard someone say "incentivize" on public TV.
        >
        >> That's been around for a long time. yrs,
        >
        > Where there's a noun, there will soon be a verb. (One of Paul's many 
laws)
        >
        > Robert Paul
        >
         

Other related posts: