[lit-ideas] Hereabouts

  • From: david ritchie <profdritchie@xxxxxxxxx>
  • To: lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
  • Date: Sun, 14 Feb 2016 11:16:21 -0800

You’ll be familiar with the northern English expression, “Where there’s muck, 
there’s brass,” brass meaning money.  I’ve just seen “muck" translated into 
French, “Fertilisation,” which no doubt gave us “fertilizer."  So where does 
muck come from?  Middle English muk, Old English moc, Old Norse, myki.  I 
cannot help but wonder what an an encounter between a Norman overlord and an 
Anglo Saxon peasant encounter must have been like, 
“Etalez le fertilisation.”
“What?”
“Le fertilisation.”
“Point.  With your fin-ger.”
[points] “Le fertilisation.”
“Myki?”
“Mooooooki?”
“Yeah, Myki.”
“Meuck?”


When I went up on the roof last weekend I cleared away five wheelbarrow loads 
of tree debris.  Or maybe a thousand.  A lot.  There are days when I’m not in 
favor of trees.  But when I went up on the roof I also bothered the chickens.  
They were too far away for me to see who was saying what, but I heard clearly 
enough.
“Whaaaaaaat?”
“He seems to be perching.”
“That’s not right, that isn’t.”
“No, no, no, no, no.”
“If he falls, we’ll be without a god and then where will we be?”
“Atheism.”
“Pantheism at an absolute minimum.”
“Can one extract kibble from Nature?”
“That’s the point.  Nature provides worms and bugs and such, but it takes a god 
to provide bread and other miracles.”
“What shall we do?”
“Worship, girls, worship for all you’re worth.”
The roof was wet and so I was being extraordinarily cautious, scooting all over 
on my seat, brushing debris from a seated position.  Without the advantage 
standing would have given me, I couldn’t see their knees, but the chicken’s 
bobbing suggested genuflection.  I waved to reassure them.
“The god has made a sign.”
“Indeed, but of what?”
“Of what, what?”
“What does the sign mean?  A mere wave could mean the end of the world or the 
beginning of a golden age.  How should we parse it.”
“Parsnip?”
“I don’t like parsnips.  Never have.”
“Speaking of which, he’s chucking things down.”
“Thunderbolts?”
“No, I believe it’s twigs.”

I’ve tried to tell the cats and the chickens that Hamish is coming in 
mid-March.  I suggest they might like to make appropriate mental preparation.  
The cats pretend they don’t speak English.  The chickens seem to be laboring 
under the misapprehension that an animal which starts smaller than they are is 
bound to lose all power struggles.  This is probably dinosaur inheritance 
expressing itself.  I try to tell them that mammals prevailed in that 
particular bout, but they are having none of it.  Beaks and claws, peck and 
feather, top of the pile... until not.

The web said the plant can grow to twenty feet, so I trimmed the oak-leafed 
hydrangea.  I also pulled errant blackberries (what other kind are there 
hereabouts) from beneath the Juniper.  In both cases I disturbed a place where 
the chickens have held regular meetings.  Ever since I’ve been hearing 
whisperings about intrusive policing.  There’s talk of protest marches.  I 
think I’d be in for it if successive groups of migrating birds hadn’t been 
arriving and distracting the girls with news from afar.  Because Malheur is on 
a migration route the chickens may have heard of that drama’s end.  With any 
luck this will prevent chickens from exercising their first or even second 
amendment rights.  Imagine if they began to think of themselves as "the best 
security" of anything, a militia of chickens.  Maybe I should stop chucking 
parsnips at the squirrels?  Parsnips thrown from a high balcony could be 
misconstrued.

David Ritchie,
Portland, 
Oregon------------------------------------------------------------------
To change your Lit-Ideas settings (subscribe/unsub, vacation on/off,
digest on/off), visit www.andreas.com/faq-lit-ideas.html

Other related posts: