[lit-ideas] Hereabouts

  • From: david ritchie <profdritchie@xxxxxxxxx>
  • To: lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
  • Date: Sun, 11 Feb 2018 11:07:49 -0800

Mimo wandered over, “Is there some kind of Olympics coming up?”
“As a matter of fact they’re starting this week.  How did you know?”
Appenzeller, “The way the dog goes chasing round the garden.”
Pecorino, “We assume there’s some kind of anti-squirrel event that he’s 
training for.”
“I can check if you like but I don’t think that’s included in the Winter 
Olympics.”
Mimo, “He’s probably not going to make the team.”
Pecorino, “He does seem a bit useless at catching them.”
I said in Hamish’ defense, “He’s got other things on his mind.”

Remember that line from American radio comedians Bob and Ray, “Write if you get 
work”?  Hamish should be writing.  In addition to his self-appointed station in 
life-- as chief rat and squirrel catcher-- he has developed aspirations 
towards, and some experience of, the job of  chief coyote chaser.

People believe that thinking outside the box is a good idea; Hamish’s variation 
on this notion is that evening peeing outside the fence is also good.  There’s 
a vocabulary to the exercise that I’ve only begun to understand: some dogs’ pee 
you want to mark thus; others another way.   Occasionally you want to 
obliterate all traces with swipes of your back feet.  “This smell does not 
deserve a place in the universe of odours.” 

L. put Hamish out when she went up to bed.  As I was shutting down the computer 
I heard him barking over by the road.  When I stepped out there was no late 
evening dog walker passing so I reasoned there had to have been a coyote.  I 
thought I waited long enough to let it get away before I opened the gate to let 
Hamish out to do his territorial claiming, but instead of the usual trot over 
to a favorite stone and the wee placid whiddle, there was a sudden blur; he 
raced round to the front of the house.  I’m pleased to report he didn’t forget 
the rules or himself; he stopped well inside our property line.  Across the 
road, trotting away slowly, was a coyote about the same size as him.   There 
followed an unusual amount of woofing, “Get off with you.  A big dog lives 
here.  And no chickens.”  He ran back to me, wagging vigorously,  “Didn’t I do 
well?”

Our neighborhood list says that not long after on the same evening a pack of 
coyotes set on some poor animal.  That’s my worry.  Though I keep a long metal 
rod (an old easel support) handy—the idea is to wave it and make noise--there’s 
no way he or I could fight a pack.  So Hamish may think he’s found a job, but 
I’m not going to open the gate in similar circumstance.  He can pee inside the 
fence, color inside the lines, do what one has to do to avoid being overwhelmed 
by the pack.

This week saw a return to “Christmas in the library,” which is an exercise for 
a pack of students.  I invented it to divert them from thinking that if they 
type a few key words into a search engine they’ll find all there is to know 
about a research topic.  It works like this: the students write a caption or a 
title or something that reminds us what we know about their inquiry.  We then 
take those pieces of paper in hand and search the library stacks for material 
which we sense may be helpful to others.  (It’s also O.K. to pull books and 
magazines that seem worthwhile to your own project).  Everyone comes back with 
a pile of books which they distribute with the usual Christmas wishes, “This 
reminds me of…I thought you’d like…You can return it if...”  Receivers smile 
and say, “Exactly what I wanted,” or “Thank you, that’s interestin" or “How did 
you know?”  The goals are to give students a view into how others perceive 
their projects and to turn up the sort of stuff that you might not find except 
by happenstance.  Above all, there’s a lot of handling of books which this year 
(unlike last where everyone took photos of books with their phones) led to 
everyone checking volumes out.  Huzzah!  There are signs in the library 
instructing us not to re-shelve books so all we have to do at the end is put 
what we don’t want on the re-shelving cart.  I use the exercise in my Masters 
thesis class but it would be fine for upper division research projects.  We all 
learned, which is a pretty good outcome.  I suppose I should re-title the 
exercise though, “Non-denominational holiday gift exchange?"

David Ritchie,
Portland, 
Oregon------------------------------------------------------------------
To change your Lit-Ideas settings (subscribe/unsub, vacation on/off,
digest on/off), visit www.andreas.com/faq-lit-ideas.html

Other related posts: