[lit-ideas] Re: Hands Across The Bay

  • From: "" <dmarc-noreply@xxxxxxxxxxxxx> (Redacted sender "jlsperanza" for DMARC)
  • To: lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
  • Date: Fri, 1 Dec 2017 17:39:59 -0500

McEvoy makes a reference to the ‘drawing of [a] line’ when it comes to things 
like concepts (or terms) and I am fascinated by this. If I understand McEvoy 
alright, this ‘drawing of [a] line’ is a matter of ‘contingency,’ as 
philosophers like to say, not ‘analysis’ – which reminds me of Grunebaum. (It 
would remind me of Popper if we were talking here Popperese and refer to 
Popper’s favoured notion of ‘dialysis’ – to contrast wit ‘analysis’. But 
Grunebaum, in his “Defense of a dogma,” co-authored with his tuttee, P. F. 
Strawson, deals with a defense, interestingly, of a DISTINCTION: the 
‘analytic-synthetic’ distinction. It was I think until Kripke made things 
clearer to us that we started to see that there are TWO (albeit related) 
criteria here: one, shall we say, semantic: the analytic-synthetic; the other 
more on the ‘metaphysical’ or ontological side: the necessary-contingent. They 
may collapse, but perhaps they should not!
I guess the conceptual analyst could play a little with various things:
First, why is it Walker at para 101, and not Collins, who plays with this point 
about the ‘concept’ or ‘term’ “capacity”? If one sees a piece of legal 
reasoning as a ‘slate’ of premises (as Grunebaum has it in places like his 
“Vacuous Names”), one would think that the ordering does matter (101, rather 
than, say, 44). But perhaps it does not.  
Second, and, in any case, I take McEvoy’s points to be ‘general,’ and I would 
play with the idea of a ‘legal’ “system,” already referred to – and a term used 
in the Roberts case. It might be argued that while it is a matter of 
[ontological] contingency that the law is what it is (and McEvoy’s excursus on 
the history of law nicely illustrates this), once we speak of a ‘system,’ and 
the drawing of this or that line, SOME idea of ‘analysis,’ may become more 
relevant. At another point in the document, a remark is made about the 
‘classical’ “definitions” and the ‘legal’ “lexicon.” It might be argued that, 
more explicitly, once a ‘term’ is introduced under this or that ‘definition’ in 
the ‘lexicon,’ – almost alla Carnap and his ‘Meaning Postulates,’ that 
Grunebaum/Strawson seem to implicitly defend against Quine to whom their piece 
is ‘dedicated’ --  it becomes analytic that certain states of affairs hold and 
other do not. Deontic logicians (some of which are ‘into’ legal reasoning) 
might easily agree with this ‘analytic’ side to jurisprudence (never mind 
Hart!).
In McEvoy’s ‘third’ case or scenario, the issue of INjustice arises, which 
brings further ‘problems,’ in that evaluative principles are at stake. In 
“Aspects of Reason,” Grunebaum does notably NOT want to ‘multiply’ the uses of 
‘reason’ or ‘satisfactoriness.’ However, bringing in evaluative notions (like 
justice and INjustice) seems then to necessitate the incorporation of something 
MORE than the mere Frege stroke of ‘assertion’ ⊢ (qua mark of ‘theoretical’ 
analyticity). Grunebaum plays with “!” as the correlate stroke for ‘evaluative’ 
satisfactoriness, which has to do with issues of ‘desirability,’ rather than 
mere assertoric force or ‘probability’ (Grunebaum’s correlate for 
‘desirability’). But the issues, I grant, become PRETTY complex, provided, of 
course, they may be deemed intelligible!
And thanks to McEvoy for elaborating on Walker’s reference to the ‘concept’ of 
a “capacity.”
Cheers,
Speranza
REFERENCES
Grunebaum, H. P. & P. F. Strawson, In defense of a dogma. In Grunebaum, 
“Studies in the Way of Words.” (Grunebaum forbade, if that’s the word, Strawson 
to reprint this “Defense” in any of Strawson’s many publications!). 

Other related posts: