[lit-ideas] Grice's Stream of Consciousness

  • From: "" <dmarc-noreply@xxxxxxxxxxxxx> (Redacted sender "jlsperanza" for DMARC)
  • To: lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
  • Date: Sun, 10 Sep 2017 18:29:35 -0400

There is something Griceian about Joyce.

No, I don’t mean Joyce Grenfell (There’s _loads_ Gricean about Grenfell). I 
mean James Joyce, the Irish author (whose life was portrayed in the film “Nora” 
by Ewan McGregor).

Why? Well, because both James Joyce and Grice rely on William James’s model of 
the ‘stream of consciousness’. In Grice’s case it’s clearest in his last 
William James lecture, where Grice speaks of the stream of meaning and the 
stream of consciousness. (Along with the “Prolegomena” – the first William 
James lecture --, “Indicative Conditionals” – the fourth William James lecture 
--, the last William James lecture – “Some Models for Implicature” – was only 
published by Grice (who died in 1988) in 1989.

Grice notes: “The psychological attitudes which attend the word FLOWS [emphasis 
mine – Speranza] of thought do so as causes and effects of the word FLOWS in 
question. This is part of one’s authority [as the author of one’s utterances] 
to assign acceptable interpretations to one’s own internal word FLOWS.”

It is obviously that Grice is flirting with the Jamesians in the audience who 
would love Grice’s reference to the ‘flow,’ which is like a ‘stream’.

Grice’s William James lectures were delivered in 1967. Only circa 1975 he 
endorsed a ‘functionalist’ approach to psychological attitudes, and so, by 
1975, he would feel less happy about calling some word flows ‘internal’. 
William James never had THAT problem!

I mention this because Donal McEvoy was referring to a ‘mistake,’ as he calls 
it in the quote above. The ‘mistake’ seems to be in gross opposition to E. M. 
Forster’s advice, “Only connect.”  

“Popper himself may have once made this mistake when referring to Joyce's 
"stream of consciousness" as if this expression denoted a specific 
philosophical position on how the mind works (perhaps someone more informed can 
tell us whether Joyce intended it this way?). The expression, originating with 
William James, may be taken to be quite distinct when it pertains to a style of 
writing which tries to simulate how the mind works as if a "stream of 
consciousness" [a la Joyce] as opposed to when it is unpacked to denote a 
philosophical position that, for example, takes the mind as a stream of 
consciously experienced 'data' (as the mind is taken to be in many forms of 
"empiricism"). In other words, Joyce may not be committing any kind of 
philosophical mistake in developing a literary aesthetic in terms of "stream of 
consciousness", and it may be a mistake to treat him as if he were.”

But let’s revise Popper’s alleged mistake with Joyce – if not Popper.

“Popper himself may have once made this mistake when referring to Joyce's 
"stream of consciousness" as if this expression denoted a specific 
philosophical position on how the mind works (perhaps someone more informed can 
tell us whether Joyce intended it this way?). The expression, originating with 
William James, may be taken to be quite distinct when it pertains to a style of 
writing which tries to simulate how the mind works as if a "stream of 
consciousness" [a la Joyce] as opposed to when it is unpacked to denote a 
philosophical position that, for example, takes the mind as a stream of 
consciously experienced 'data' (as the mind is taken to be in many forms of 
"empiricism"). In other words, Joyce may NOT [emphasis mine – Speranza] be 
committing any kind of 
philosophical mistake in developing a literary aesthetic in terms of "stream of 
consciousness", and it may be a mistake to treat him as if he were.”

Well, we are not sure if Joyce did read William James? (He seems to have read 
_everything_ -- and as Hawking notes, ‘everything’ INCLUDES William James.

For the record, it is possible that the inspiration for Joyce’s Molly is, of 
all people, one Amalia Popper, whom Joyce knew while living in Trieste.

Amalia Popper was the daughter of Leopoldo Popper, who worked for the freight 
forwarding company “Adolf Blum & Popper” founded by Adolf Blum, after whom, 
incidentally, Leopold Bloom was named.

There are some Griceian implicatures here:

Why did Popper (that’s Leopoldo) – if it was his decision – named his daughter 
“Amalia,” rather than, say, “Molly”. It may be argued that “Molly” is _short_ 
for “Amalia,” when “Amalia” is mispronounced.

Why was the company named “Adolf Blum & Popper” and NOT “Adolf Blum and 
Leopoldo Popper”? The implicature seems to be that Popper (that’s Leopoldo) is 
minor, compared to Blum. There may be a further implicature to the effect that, 
for Adolf Blum to name his company “Adolf Blum & al” would have been _silly_.

Cheers,

Speranza

Other related posts: