[lit-ideas] Grice's Blade

  • From: "" <dmarc-noreply@xxxxxxxxxxxxx> (Redacted sender "Jlsperanza" for DMARC)
  • To: lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
  • Date: Sat, 6 Feb 2016 07:24:41 -0500

Popper and Miller

In a message dated 2/4/2016 10:27:45 A.M. Eastern  Standard Time, 
donalmcevoyuk@xxxxxxxxxxx writes: "Popper ... explains [this] in  terms of the 
difference between logical and material implication ... which  distinction JL 
Mackie failed to observe when he made a similar  "self-contradictory" criticism 
in his review of Popper's Schilpp  volumes."

That had the ball rolling, as it well.
 
I.e. that started it all, as it were. I.e. the Mackie thread.  

Because Mackie is an expert in probability -- he wrote a whole book on  
that, and it even inspired Griceians like Jackson and D. K. Lewis as to how to  
deal implicaturally with "NON-material implication" conditionals.

Now,  Popper had played with Alfred Landé's dangerous blade, hadn't he?

And the  blade had an strange effect on Watkins. 

So, Watkins centred his  contribution to the Schillp volume on the blade.

Now, when Mackie  reviewed the Schlipp collection of essays ("Library of 
Living Philosophers,"  because Popper was living then) he found that Watkins's 
treatment of the blade  was not too sharp (""[B]lunt" would be an 
overstatement," -- Mackie).

And  so Watkins had 'second thoughts' on the blade.

It IS a dangerous blade,  admittedly.

For the Italians amongst us, the Merli-Missiroli-Pozzi's  experiment may be 
be seen as a microscopic version of the Lande's blade, which  would rather 
be macroscopic. 

Alfred Lande's billiard balls become for  Merli, Missoroli, and Pozzi, 
electrons. 

Alfred Lande's blade becomes for  Merli, Missoroli and Pozzi, the bi-prism 
wire, if you've seen one.   

In Lande's device, that fascinated Popper, rough big billiard balls roll  
down a chute onto the edge of a blade -- that Popper named "Lande's" -- cfr.  
Wittgenstein's Poker -- was it Wittgenstein's, really?).

In any case,  about half of Alfred Lande's big billiard balls or Merli's, 
Missoroli's and  Pozzi's small electrons are deflected to one side.

About the other half  falls on the other side. 

The important point to notice is that in  Lande's macroscopic blade or in 
Merli's, Missoroli's, and Pozzi's microscopic  blade, is not that the balls 
(or electrons, or corpuscules, asa I prefer) are  EQUALLY distributed on each 
side.

It is Alfred Lande's device itself  (that Popper figuratively called 
"Lande's blade" -- short for "Lande's bland  argument") does not cause ALL the 
billiard balls (or electrons) to fall to one  side only.

What Lande, and, a fortiori, Popper, want to show -- but  according to 
Miller, convincingly, they fail, "if for different reasons"-- is  that there 
can 
be no deterministic explanation of statistical probability.  

"No more, no less," as Geary has it.

Now, Popper’s reasoning  indeed, did have supporters (within the "Popper 
Circle", notably Watkins in his  second thoughts on the blade. But why is it 
that it somewhat had more critics:  Mackie for one, and Miller for two?

One reason may be that Popper could  not play billiards.
 
One of Lande's favourite quotes by Geary: "The revolutionary hypotheses of  
yesterday are today hardened into axioms."

Geary explained to me that by "today," Lande meant the day when Lande  
wrote that not the day when I _learned_ that. I learned many other things from  
Geary. Geary told me that Lande's famous g-factor "was named after Grice." 
Be J  the total electronic angular momentum, L is the orbital angular 
momentum, and S  is the spin angular momentum. Because S=1/2 for electrons, one 
often sees this  formula written with 3/4 in place of S(S+1). The quantities gL 
and gS are other  g-factors of an electron. 
 
But I checked the dates and either Lande is referring to an ancestor to  
_our_ Grice, or else 'g' stands also for 'God', who, again to quote from 
Geary,  "works in mysterious ways," and can well make Lande make Grice one of 
the 
 sources for his infamous blade.
 
Cheers,
 
Speranza


Cheers,

Speranza
 

Other related posts:

  • » [lit-ideas] Grice's Blade