[lit-ideas] Grice's "Another ThinK Coming": The Implicature

  • From: "" <dmarc-noreply@xxxxxxxxxxxxx> (Redacted sender "jlsperanza" for DMARC)
  • To: lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
  • Date: Wed, 13 Sep 2017 19:57:02 -0400

McEvoy’s first reaction upon encountering Ritchie’s “another think coming,” was 
to look for enlightment, and he summarized the view in such a way that reminded 
me of … Grice – for I took McEvoy’s words to say that BOTH views – ‘another 
thinK coming’ and ‘another thinG coming’ were correct – (I have not changed my 
mind). It was while thinking that both expressions were correct, or rather than 
an utterer has the inalienable right to utter as he pleases that I compliled a 
little bibliographical list to support Grice’s idiosyncrasy (A procedure to 
utter x meaning thereby by p is idiosyncratic, for Grice, if it is within the 
utterer to decide). Or something. Anyway, the references below.

McEvoy was referring to keyword: solecism. I once did a study on this and found 
out that solecism is more like a dialect thing. Originally, a solecism was a 
dialectal feature rather than anything wrong. In any case, McEvoy is presenting 
the case that ‘another thinK coming’ is NOT a solecism. A solecism is like a 
malaprop – and Davidson started a little defense of them in his “A nice 
derangement of epitaphs” – but then I don’ think ‘another thinK coming,’ being 
a correct phrase, can be a malaprop. So the references below pertain more to 
those who think it is “another thinG coming” which is the _correct_ expression 
and to what right they have to utter “another thinG coming,” to mean, now in 
Griceian parlance, well, _another thing coming_. Or something

Cheeers,

Speranza

 

·             Baldwin, D. and M. Meyer, “How Inherently Social is Language?”, 
in Hoff and Shatz.

·             Barber, A. “Idiolectal Error”, Mind and Language, 16 -- cfr. 
Grice on 'aiming at conformity' and 'correct' vs. 'incorrect' use -- in Grice's 
sixth William James lecture -- repr. in Searle, "The philosophy of language," 
(Oxford Readings in Philosophy, ed. by G. J. Warnock). And cfr. Grice on 
Deutero-Esperanto ("That makes me the master"). ––– Epistemology of Language, 
Oxford: Oxford University Press.

·             Begby, E. and B. Ramberg, “Davidson’s Derangement of Epitaphs in 
PGRICE, Philosophical Grounds of Rationality:  Intentions, Categories, Ends -- 
Revisited: Guest Editors’ Introduction”, Inquiry 59

·             Bennett, J. Linguistic Behaviour, Cambridge: Cambridge University 
Press. Cfr. Grice's correspondence with J. Bennett, The Grice Papers, BANC MSS 
90/135c.

·             Burge, T. “On Knowledge and Convention”, Philosophical Review, 84

·             Cappelen, H. and E. Lepore, Insensitive Semantics: A Defense of 
Semantic Minimalism and Speech Act Pluralism, New York: Wiley-Blackwell. 

·             Collins, J. “Representations Without Representata: Content and 
Illusion in Linguistic Theory”, in Piotr Stalmaszczyk (ed.), Semantics and 
Beyond: Philosophical and Linguistic Inquiries, Walter de Gruyter.

·             Crystal, D. The Fight for English: How Language Pundits Ate, 
Shot, and Left, Oxford: Oxford University Press.

·             Davidson, D. “Semantics for Natural Languages”, in Visentini et 
al. ––– Inquiries into Truth and Interpretation, New York: Oxford University 
Press.––– “A Nice Derangement of Epitaphs”, in PGRICE, Philosophical Grounds of 
Rationality: Intentions, Categories, Ends -- vide R. Grandy and R. Warner's 
abstract of it. 

·             Dummett, M. A. E. “A Nice Derangement of Epitaphs: Some Comments 
on Davidson and Hacking”, in Lepore. 

·             Fodor, J. Psychosemantics: The Problem of Meaning in the 
Philosophy of Mind, Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

·             Grice, Herbert Paul, 1938. Negation-- 1948. 1957, “Meaning”, 
Philosophical Review, 66–––, 1967. 1975, “Logic and Conversation”, in P. Cole 
and J. Morgan (eds.), Syntax and Semantics, Volume 3. London: Academic Press. 
Reprinted in H. P. Grice, Studies in the Way of Words, Cambridge, Mass.: 
Harvard University Press, 1989.-- 1980. Meaning Revisited (on 
"Deutero-Esperanto")-- 1976. Pirotese. In Grice, BANC MSS 90/135c.-- 1967. 
Utterer's meaning, sentence meaning, and word meaning, Harvard. Repr. in 
Searle, The Philosophy of Language. 

·             Hacking, I. “The Parody of [Griceian] Conversation”, in Lepore.

·             Higginbotham, J. “Languages and Idiolects: Their Language and 
Ours”, in Lepore and Smith 

·             Lewis, D. Convention: A Philosophical Study, Cambridge, MA: 
Harvard University Press.–––"Languages and Language”, in Gunderson.

·             Millikan, R. “In Defense of Public Language”, in her Language: A 
Biological Model, Oxford: Oxford University Press.

·             Pietroski, P. “A Defense of Derangement -- Griceian or other”, 
Canadian Journal of Philosophy, 24–––“The Character of Natural Language 
Semantics”, in Barber 

·             Putnam, H. “The Meaning of ‘Meaning’”, in Gunderson -- cfr. 
Grice, "I became less of a formalist after Putnam, of all people, told me I 
should!"

·             Quine, W.V., “Methodological Reflections on Current Linguistic 
Theory”, Synthese, 21-- vide H. P. Grice's reply to Quine in "Vacuous Names", 
in "Words and objections". 

·             Reimer, M. “What Malapropisms Mean: A Griceian Reply to 
Davidson”, Erkenntnis 60

·             Strawson, P F., On Referring, Mind, 59 -- repr. in 
Logico-Linguistic Papers. -- Introduction to Logical Theory, citing "Mr. H. P. 
Grice". 

·             Wiggins, D. “Languages as Social Objects”, Philosophy, 72

Other related posts:

  • » [lit-ideas] Grice's "Another ThinK Coming": The Implicature