[lit-ideas] Re: Griceiana

  • From: Omar Kusturica <omarkusto@xxxxxxxxx>
  • To: lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
  • Date: Sat, 14 Mar 2015 11:59:05 +0100

"Grice" is a Scots and northern English dialect  word originally meaning
"young pig" (compare the Scandinavian gris, meaning  "pig").

As it happens, that is just ONE possible explanation. The alternative one,
which I hold, and Grice held, is that it's Anglo-Norman, and related to the
 colour 'grey', or 'gray', if you must. Cfr. Italian 'griso', 'grisatoio',
'grisetta'.


*Well, I can see how Grice would have prefered that explanation. It is not
very pleasant to be associated with a type of swine, particularly one that
is: "voracious in the extreme, and excessively difficult to confine in
pasture or to fatten... also destructive and mischievous." And if the talk
about causality thoeries and implicatures went too far, neighbours could
start "grumbling about the behaviour of ... grice" and the courts might be
forced to move "confiscate particularly troublesome pigs, and to impose
"hefty fines" on their owners.[5]
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grice#cite_note-NewScientist2006-5>" "


O.K.






On Sat, Mar 14, 2015 at 11:20 AM, Redacted sender Jlsperanza@xxxxxxx for
DMARC <dmarc-noreply@xxxxxxxxxxxxx> wrote:

> In a message dated 3/14/2015 3:10:51 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
> omarkusto@xxxxxxxxx writes:
> "Grice" is a Scots and northern English dialect  word originally meaning
> "young pig" (compare the Scandinavian gris, meaning  "pig").
>
> As it happens, that is just ONE possible explanation. The alternative one,
> which I hold, and Grice held, is that it's Anglo-Norman, and related to the
>  colour 'grey', or 'gray', if you must. Cfr. Italian 'griso', 'grisatoio',
> 'grisetta'.
>
> Now, puns abound. My favourite is Kemmerling's. He speaks of 'gricing' as a
>  special type of communication -- that disallows sneaky elements. The
> opposite is  'disgricing'. Dennett has
>
> grice
>
> as a noun meaning
>
> Conceptual intricacy.
>
> "His examination of Hume is distinguished by erudition and grice."
>
> Hence, griceful, adj. and griceless, adj.
>
>  "An obvious and griceless polemic."
>
> pl. grouse: A multiplicity of grice, fragmenting into great details, often
> in reply to an original grice note.
>
> Grice should not be confused with Grice: both are philosophers but  Grice*
> taught at Oxford while Grice** taught at UEA/Norwich.
>
> If you are doing a library (say) search you have to be careful: essays with
>  titles like "Grice's contractual approach to morality" may refer to the
> UEA/Norwich Grice -- even if H. P. Grice held a quasi-contractual approach
> to
>  the conversational maxims, for example.
>
> * Herbert Paul; ** Geoffrey Russell.
>
> Cheers,
>
> Speranza
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