[lit-ideas] Re: Grice: The Complete Correspondence

  • From: "" <dmarc-noreply@xxxxxxxxxxxxx> (Redacted sender "jlsperanza" for DMARC)
  • To: lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
  • Date: Fri, 29 Sep 2017 12:32:30 -0400

We are discussing (if that’s the Griceian verb) this letter from Neal Cassady 
to J.-L. Lebris de Kérouac.
 
McEvoy refers to Cassady’s particular type of ‘verbal virtuosity’, by asking:
 
“As in them saying "That fella has such verbal virtuosity - and so Griceian 
too"?”
 
McEvoy also asks – the two questions are Griceianly related --:
 
“[W]hy is [Neal Cassady’s] verbal virtuosity specifically "Griceian" in 
character?”
 
The “Griceian” quality shows in what Grice refers to in his last William James 
lecture, “Some models for implicature,” where Grice refers to the inflow and 
the outflow – which is obviously his reference to James’s 
‘stream-of-consciousness’. It is fascinating that it was this type of verbal 
virtuosity that had J.-L Lebris de Kérouac adopt a particular technique when 
trying to imitate Cassidy’s ‘style’:
 
Before beginning to write “On the road,” J.-L. Lebris de Kérouac cut sheets of 
tracing paper into long strips, wide enough for a typewriter, and taped them 
together into a 37-metre long (this MAY have a Witters connection, since McEvoy 
was mentioning, “How long is the Paris metre?”) roll which J.-L. Lebris de 
Kérouac.then fed into the typewriter.
 
This allowed J.-L. Lebris de Kérouac to type continuously, alla Cassady, and 
Grice’s “Some models for implicature,” without the interruption of reloading 
pages.
 
The resulting manuscript of “On the road” contains no chapter or paragraph 
breaks.
 
William James at his best – (NB: Popper’s reference to William James and James 
Joyce).
 
In “Some models for implicature,” Grice refers to “the solution to [a] 
SEEMINGLY _knotty_ problem” which, “may, perhaps, lie, in the idea 
that the psychological attitudes which, in line with my theory of meaning, 
attend the word FLOWS [cfr. James's 'stream of consciousness'] of thought do so 
as CAUSES and effects of the [EXTERNAL] word flows in question, but not as 
natural causes and effects  and so NOT as states that are manifested in 
psychological episodes or thoughts which are  _numerically distinct_ form [the 
external] word 
flows which set them off or arise from them.These psychological attitudes are 
due or proper antecedents or consequentces of the [EXTERNAL] word flows in 
question and AS SUCH are legitimately DEEMED to be present in those roles. THIS 
IS PART of one's authority AS A RATIONAL THINKER to assign acceptable 
interpretations to one's INTERNAL word flows. What they may be DEEMED to 
generate [as causes] or arise from [as 
effects] is ipso facto something which they DO generate or arise 
from. The interpreation, therefore, of  ONE'S OWN VERBALLY formulated thoughts 
is 
PART of the  privilege of a thinking being. The association of our word flows 
and our psychological attitudes is FIXED BY 
US as an OUTFLOW from our having learned to use 
our language [English, say] for descriptive purposes TO DESCRIBE THE WORLD.”

in Cassady’s case, to J.-L. Lebris de Kérouac.

“SO,” Grice continues, “the psychological attitudes which, when speaking 
spontaneously [as Joyce's 
characters seem to do; they even THINK spontaneously] and yet non-arbitrarily, 
we assign as causes and effects of our [external] word flows 
have to be accepted as properly occupying that position."

It is this quality of Cassady’s verbal virtuosity that may be dubbed 
‘Griceian,’ – or not, of course.

Cheers,

Speranza

REFERENCES:

Cassady, N. L. “The first third”

J.-L. Lebris de Kérouac, “On the road”

Grice, H. P. “Some models for implicature.”

Other related posts: